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TECHNOLOGY | THERMALLY CONDUCTIVE


optimise the performance. There is also the additional need to consider how all these additives may impact the end products’ mechanical properties, as well as how these raw materials interact with each other,” Heitkamp says. “In addition, with the growing use of recycled grades, there is a need to analyse how thermal conductive additives will work with impurities.” Cabot has developed a range of thermally conductive compounds based on engineering thermoplastics with different formulations and specific additives. The most prominent recent development is a partial replacement of boron nitride, one of the more established thermally conductive additives. “With recent advances in nanomaterials we are addressing the need to develop solutions that have less impact on mechanical properties and at the same time are optimal in their conductive performance. A combination of traditional materials with the newly developed additives looks the most promising option,” he says.


Below: The heat sink on Electromag- netica’s


industrial COB LED projector lamp is


moulded in thermally conductive PA6 from Lati


Lighting innovation Italian compounder LATI recently provided a thermally conductive compound for use in a new LED lighting system produced by Romanian manufacturer Electromagnetica. Rapid evolution of LED lighting systems has led to development of increasingly powerful devices suitable for replacing conventional light sources even in the most challenging applications, for example lights for public and industrial use. The typical devices used in this sector are COB (Chip On Board) LEDs, where numerous diodes are joined together and mounted on the substrate to form a single large source. LATI says the advantages of COB LED solutions include a reduction in the number of components, fewer welded joints, absence of lenses and higher


light density. Management of the heat generated by such a structured system is vital for long service life and aluminium heat sinks have been considered as the only option for the maximum junction temperatures close to 150°C. Electromagnetica, however, decided to use a thermally conductive plastic compound to develop its latest COB LED industrial projector, completing rigorous simulations and experiments to evaluate cooling performance and emitted light quality. The result is the Castor 2M, an industrial projector that houses two COB modules for a total power close to 70W. Technical simulation showed that a thermally conductive polymer heat sink would handle the large amount of heat generated in operation provided that the geometry of the radiating elements and the interface between the PCB substrate and the thermoplastic compound was suitably configured. Electromagnetica selected LATI’s Laticonther 62


GR/70, which is a PA6-based compound with 70% graphite filler. The average thermal conductivity of this material is close to 10 W/mK, even at high ambient temperatures and regardless of the orientation of the graphitic flakes. The thermal conductivity of alloys normally used to manufacture heat sinks is close to 150 W/mK, while that for pure aluminium is 237 W/mK. The key to the performance of the heat sink is in the optimisation of the design; the thickness of the heat sink base as well as the shape and spacing of the fins have been carefully calculated for the most effective performance. In particular, an understand- ing of the thermal phenomena at the base was fundamental as radiation contributes in a similar way to convection in cooling. The higher heat capacity of plastics over alloy alternatives is also a valuable advantage as it reduces the thermal load to be transferred due to the increased heat storage capability of the sink. Laticonther advantages include low mould shrinkage and good dimension- al stability required for assembly, and reduced weight due to its density, which is close to half that of aluminium. As a result of this optimised design process, the Castor 2M is able to provide a mini- mum luminous flux of 8000 lm without the junction exceeding a temperature of 80°C.


CLICK ON THE LINKS FOR MORE INFORMATION: � www.luh.dewww.quarzwerke.com � www.hubermaterials.com � www.wittenburggroup.com � www.cabotcorp.com � www.lati.com


24 COMPOUNDING WORLD | April 2019 www.compoundingworld.com


PHOTO: LATI


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