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NEWS Saudi Aramco buys into SABIC


Saudi Aramco has acquired a 70% majority stake in Sabic from the Public Investment Fund of Saudi Arabia. The private transaction was concluded for a total of about $69bn and is subject to certain closing conditions, including regulatory approvals. The remaining 30% of SABIC will stay


Mitsui adds LFT plant in China


Japanese chemicals giant Mitsui Chemicals is to set up a 3,500 tonnes/yr facility for long glass fibre-reinforced PP (LGFPP) at its 50%-owned subsidi- ary Mitsui Advanced Composites (Zhongshan) in Guangdong province, China. The new site is due to be completed in early 2020 and will begin production in Q3. It will be the company’s third LFT compounds facility, joining others in Japan and the US, and will increase the firm’s global capacity to 10,500 tonnes/yr. � www.mitsuichem.com


in public ownership. Saudi Aramco said it had no intention of acquiring this. In a joint statement, the two compa- nies said that the deal will be key to both “in the development of the petrochemi- cals industry in Saudi Arabia and reinforces aligned objectives to create a preferred global chemicals company”.


Sabic CEO Yousef Al-Benyan said: “SABIC will benefit from the additional scale, technology, investment potential and growth opportunities Saudi Aramco will bring as a global leader in integrat- ed energy and chemicals production.” � www.sabic.com � www.saudiaramco.com


Xenia launches carbon PP


Xenia has introduced a new series of short carbon-fibre filled PP composite grades under the Xecarb 11 brand. The company said that the compounds represent “the ideal solution for a wide range of applications in chemical, industrial and sport system fields which require a high modulus to density ratio”. Xecarb 11 grades are electrically conductive, due to their carbon fibre


reinforcement, and offer a tensile strength at break of up to 115 MPa. Other claimed features include chemical resistance, high heat deflection temperature,


improved dimensional stability, reduced post shrinkage, better surface hardness and good UV resistance. � www.xeniamaterials.com


Polytechs purging rebrand


France-based Polytechs has rebranded its Clean X range of purging compounds as Clean Xpress. The company, which has a capacity of


around 23,000 tonnes/yr and also offers compounds and masterbatches and toll


compounding services, said the Clean Xpress formulations remain unchanged. The existing grade names will be retained: Clean LDPE, Clean HDPE, Clean PP, Clean HT and Clean HP. � www.cleanxpress-polytechs.com


Sabo to commercialise new UV stabiliser


SaboStab UV 2016 is aimed at agrigultural film applications


Sabo has announced the global commercialisation of SaboStab UV 2016, a new UV stabiliser system for agricultural applica- tions. The decision follows six years of development including extended field trials in Southern Italy and North Africa. The company said the new stabiliser shows “outstanding thermal and UV protection to


10 COMPOUNDING WORLD | April 2019


greenhouse films with proven resistance to agrochemicals ensuring two or more years lifetime even in the presence of high concentrations of sulphur.” The new additive also has


greater pesticide resistance than its SaboStab UV 119, which is widely used to stabilise PE- based greenhouse covers. � www.sabo.com


www.compoundingworld.com


PHOTO: SABO


PHOTO: XENIA


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