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EDITOR’S VOICE EDITOR’S VOICE TOMORROW’S TOMORROW’S F A CI LI T I E S MANAGEMENT


Editorial Editor Ryan Lloyd ryan@opusbm.co.uk


Advertising Sales Executive Megan Nourse megan@opusbm.co.uk


Circulation & Distribution Consultant Naama Gelber naama@opusbm.co.uk


Production Production Director Hannah Wilkinson hannah@opusbm.co.uk


These are turbulent times we are living through indeed.


A couple of days before writing this, an overview of the new Facilities Management Market Report from MTW Research found its way into my inbox.


http://www.marketresearchreports.co.uk/ It outlined that a staggering 50% of FM contractors are now experiencing static


or declining sales in 2019, with 30% of FM companies achieving only a ‘mediocre’ credit rating. This equates to the lowest level of growth for outsourced FM


services since 2012; a threat set to compound further by business uncertainty caused by a lack of Brexit clarity and pressure on client budgets.


The report goes on to say that average debt levels have risen by 20% in the last six years and total FM sector debt will rise by £1bn in 2019. Since 2013, the FM industry’s net worth has risen by just 8% and actually declined in 2018.


There are however reasons to be optimistic. MTW’s analysis suggests that despite these gloomy statistics, there are signs that FM contractors are


resisting the ‘race to the bottom’ in terms of contract prices and switching to ‘outcome-based measuring’. The need for differentiation and shift in focus away from low margin / high volume contracts is becoming increasingly urgent for the bundled services sector in order for the market to remain sustainable in the longer term.


In our CAFM & IT feature this month, Cloudfm’s CIO Steve Corbett, in a rather candid article on why technology requires the human touch, suggests that


computer-aided facilities management must die. Whilst generally excellent at managing data, by and large, people are not good at recording data and herein lies the problem says Corbett. It comes in direct juxtaposition to FSI’s


contribution, who believes CAFM has become a mission-critical system for any business. In these challenging times, diversity of opinion and civilised debate are essential if we are to find the solutions to some of the industry's most pertinent questions.


Enjoy the issue. Registered in England & Wales No: 06786728


Opus Business Media Limited, Zurich House, Hulley Road, Macclesfield, Cheshire, SK10 2SF


ISSN 2055-4745 Email: info@opusbm.co.uk


Tel: 01625 426054 Fax: 01625 614787


www.tomorrowsfm.com This publication is copyright Opus Business Media Limited and may not be reproduced or transmitted in any form in whole or in part without the prior written permission of Opus Business Media Limited. While every care has been taken during the preparation of this magazine, Opus Business Media Limited cannot be held responsible for the accuracy of the information herein or for any consequence arising from it. The publisher does not necessarily agree with the views and opinions expressed by contributors.


Ryan Lloyd, Editor FOLLOW US ON TWITTER OR TWEET US https://twitter.com/TomorrowsFM @TOMORROWSFM


Designer Grace O’Malley (maternity leave) grace@opusbm.co.uk


Designer Nigel Rice nigel@opusbm.co.uk


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Accounts Financial Director John Fuller john@opusbm.co.uk


CEO Mark Hanson


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www.tomorrowsfm.com


TOMORROW’S FM | 03


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