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MICROSCOPY & IMAGING


Zeiss recently released the Elyra 7 with Lattice SIM


RRESOLUTION O


EVOLUTION


ver the past few months, a string of universities and research institutes around the world have announced breakthroughs in the use of


microscope technology for animal and human brain imaging. So what have been some of the key recent developments? And what are the benefits of such innovative approaches to microscopy?


OPTICAL BIOPSY One of the most interesting recent developments has been at the Barrow Neurological Institute in Arizona, USA, where a team of researchers has employed innovative confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) to collect real-time images from experimental brain tumours in mice, as well as from human brain tumours during their


surgical removal and from human brain tumour biopsies. As part of the research, mice were injected with fluorescein sodium (FNa) before imaging and human patients received FNa intraoperatively, enabling the surgical team to view images immediately in the operating room. In the ongoing quest for better imaging


quality, super resolution optical microscopy – particularly a version known as stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) – is emerging as a key enabling tool. In recognition of this fact, a growing number of research centres around the world now use the technology, including the University of Pittsburgh and ETH Zurich in Switzerland. So, what exactly is STORM? What microscopy technology does it use? What are the main advantages


Andrew Williams explores the rise of super-resolution microscopy and finds out what it’s being used to accomplish


of using STORM technology for imaging? And what are the current and potential applications?


BREAKING THE LIMITS According to some observers, the emergence of super resolution optical microscopy is helping to enable a step change in the way that scientists approach research across a number of disciplines – and is rapidly becoming a vital tool in the laboratory. As Dr Dorothea Pinotsi, staff scientist - Single-Molecule, Super Resolution and Spectroscopy Applications in the ScopeM Scientific Centre for Optical and Electron Microscopy at ETH Zürich, explains, optical super-resolution microscopy techniques have ‘revolutionised’ research in life sciences. In collaboration


www.scientistlive.com 53


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