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The Cary 3500 UV-Vis spectrophotometer


SMARTUV-VISSPECTROPHOTOMETRY I


Dr Ursula Tems & Dr Matt Quinn explain how simultaneously measuring standards, controls and unknown samples without any moving parts is giving a new meaning to analytical instrument reliability and reproducibility


n today’s lab, where effi ciency and uncompromising quality is vital, managers need assurance that the instruments they purchase can meet this


ever-increasing demand, and will improve workfl ows. T is is particularly apparent in the pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical industries, where quality at an optimal speed is crucial, data integrity is of utmost importance, and time to market is critical for success. One way to increase sample throughput


and save time is to buy more instruments. But the practical reality is not that simple: buying more instruments is a greater fi nancial outlay while adding a large maintenance and validation burden. Another approach to improve effi ciency is to buy a faster instrument. Many UV-Vis spectrophotometers available today are fast – but effi ciency and sample throughput are


38 www.scientistlive.com


key features required to improve workfl ow. For example, the Cary 3500 enables a complete experiment to be performed in a single measurement because each sample is measured at the same time. T e Cary 3500 UV-Vis


spectrophotometer was designed to improve the user workfl ow at the instrument, enabled by the modular instrument architecture that also allows system optimisation for the type of measurement performed. It contains a Xenon lamp that fl ashes at 250Hz (collecting 250 data points per second) and an ultra-fast monochromator. Together these allow data to be collected at rates up to 150,000nm/ min, which means that a full spectrum can be collected and displayed on the screen in less than 1.0s. T e speed gains are amplifi ed by splitting the light from the single Xenon fl ash lamp and directing it to


all eight cuvette positions simultaneously. Measurements are performed on every cuvette position at the exact same time. With air-cooled Peltier temperature control the system can confi gure to collect data from multiple samples at diff erent temperatures simultaneously (Fig. 1). T is simultaneity removes all unwanted variables from kinetics measurements and protein analysis.


TEMPERATURE RAMPING RATE AND SENSITIVITY Benjamin Tadgell and Eser M. Akinoglu from the ARC Centre of Excellence in Exciton Science School of Chemistry, University of Melbourne, Australia have been using the instrument to research how temperature aff ects the scattering properties of gold nanoparticles coated in PNIPAM polymer.


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