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CHROMATOGRAPHY


Fig. 2. The CPC 250 with PLC 2250 Purifi cation System. A separate, analytical HPLC platform is used to analyse the CPC extracts


CPC FOR CBD


a promising therapeutic tool in a wide range of non-psychiatric (impact on infl ammation, oxidative stress) and psychiatric disorders such as anxiety, depression and psychosis.[1]


C It lacks


the psychotomimetic and other psychotropic eff ects that the main plant compound ∆9- tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) antagonises. T is property, together with its safety profi le, was an initial stimulus for the investigation of CBD pharmacological properties. Although the pharmacological eff ects of CBD in diff erent biological systems have been extensively investigated by in vitro studies, the mechanisms responsible for its therapeutic potential are still in progress.[2]


Once the


bioactivity of such compounds has been shown in a large variety of scientifi c studies, the availability of reliable isolation of CBD (Fig. 1) qualitatively and quantitatively, has proven to


30 www.scientistlive.com


annabidiol (CBD), the main non- psychotropic phytocannabinoid (pCBs) present in the Cannabis sativa L. (Cannabaceae) plant, is presented as


be crucial to perform. All pCBs are uniquely found in cannabis, with the total number of identifi ed pCBs currently reported as over 100 (together with over 500 non-cannabinoid constituents), which makes the isolation a tedious task. Classical chromatographic methods such as high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and fl ash chromatography cannot always give the effi ciency and rate needed to meet the demand for CBD research, and they are too expensive to do on a large scale. Because of the structural similarities of cannabis compounds and adsorption behaviour on solid stationary phases, the large-scale production of pure CBD remains diffi cult to achieve by conventional preparative separation techniques. T e conventional techniques can require expensive consumables and frequent replacements, and can take days. At the same time, centrifugal partition chromatography (CPC) attracts attention


Gregoire Audo details effi cient cannabidiol extraction with centrifugal partition chromatography


as an alternative for purifi cation processes, especially for high added value active pharmaceutical compounds such as cannabis, by his high loading capacity, total recovery of the loaded sample, low solvent consumption and easy scale-up. CPC (Fig. 2) operates via the same


chromatographic principles as HPLC, but the two techniques use diff erent chemistry and mechanics to perform separation. Unlike HPLC, CPC doesn’t use a cylindrical column to contain the stationary phase. Instead, the CPC column consists of CPC discs arranged on a rotor. T e discs are a series of partition cells connected by narrow ducts. Each cell contains a liquid stationary phase that is held in place by centrifugal force, as the rotor (column) spins. Each cell contains a liquid stationary phase that is held in place by centrifugal force, as the rotor (column) spins. T e mobile phase is pumped through the stationary phase and mobilises the


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