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Remineralization Tooth remineralization is a repair process for tooth lesions in which calcium, phosphate and sometimes fluoride ions are deposited into crystal voids in demineralized enamel. Remineralization can help restore strength and function within the structure of the teeth and Omyadent 100 has been specially developed for this purpose.


Natural Ingredients


Figure 5


Figure 3: Omyadent 100 particles in Scanning Electro Microscopy (SEM) images


®


Figure 4 shows how surface lesions in tooth enamel can be repaired with Omyadent 100. Here, an enamel specimen treated with Omyadent 100 and 1450 ppm sodium monofluorophosphate has a smoother surface: defects have been repaired by a process of remineralization (images 1000x).


Erosion depth after five days (26 µm) as well as after 10 days (58 µm) was significantly lower than in the negative control group, but slightly higher than in the positive control group (benchmark toothpaste containing fluoride).


Preventing sensitivity


To target the growing issue of dental hypersensitivity, Omyadent 200 has been specially developed with small particles that effectively occlude exposed dentin tubules so that stimuli are unable to trigger dentinal fluid movement and pain. At the same time, the porosity of the ingredient means that the flow of nutrients within the tubules is maintained.


Figure 4: Before treatment


After treatment


In a recent study, three groups of samples were subjected to a cycle of acid erosion and remineralization: Group A was a negative control (no toothpaste); group B was a positive control (market product based on patented technology, containing fluoride and other ingredients, and having an anti-erosion claim), while group C was treated with a test toothpaste containing 5% Omyadent 100, silica as the abrasive and no fluoride. The samples were exposed to 0.6 % citric acid (pH circa 2.3) six times a day for 10 days, for two minutes each time, followed by rinsing with deionized water for one minute. After the first and last exposure, the samples were stored in the toothpaste slurry allocated to their group (one part toothpaste, two parts water) for six minutes. Subsequently, the samples were rinsed with deionized water for 30 seconds and stored in a remineralization solution of 1.98 mM CaCl2, 20.1 mM KCl, 11.9 mM NaHCO3, 4.09 mMH3PO4 (pH 6.7). The negative control samples were stored in the remineralization solution immediately after erosion and rinsing. All of the samples were kept in the remineralization solution overnight and analysis of the results showed that Groups B and C (market toothpaste and 5% Omyadent 100 toothpaste) had a marked anti-erosive effect on the tooth enamel.


Issue 2 • March/April 2021


Figure 6: Omyadent 200 particles in Scanning Electro Microscopy (SEM) images


® Tubule morphologies in longitudinal sections have proven that


Omyadent 200 effectively occludes dentinal tubules. As can be seen in Figure 7, the particles are not only located on the surface of a tubule, but also within them (Image A). Omyadent 200 particles as well as silica particles were identified up to a 9-micrometre depth inside the tubule (Image B), when a toothpaste formulated with Omyadent 200 was used.


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