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1813 Club and Premier Members


Solicitors’ campaign urges larger take-up of wills


A national firm of solicitors has launched a campaign to encourage people to make a will. Clarke Willmott, which has an office in Birmingham, said that more than half of the UK’s adult population did not have a will, which was a failure to safeguard their family’s future. Carol Cummins, private wealth team leader at the


firm, said that wills were crucial when dealing with significant assets and certain family circumstances. She said: “While everyone with assets should


have a will, the issue of not having a will quickly becomes more complicated when the value of assets increases. “For example, many people who are in their mid-


life and who have been property owners for 20 plus years are likely to have seen a significant increase in the value of their home, never mind any other assets that they have accumulated. “There are also complexities around less straight-


forward modern families. With second or third marriages and blended families much more common now, a will drawn up by a specialist will ensure that your assets go to exactly those you wish. “An accurate and correctly structured will not only


gives peace of mind, it can mean more money for your family in the future by saving on inheritance tax. There is a difference, though, between having a will and having a good will and this is one of the key messages of our campaign.


“Having a badly drawn up, or DIY, will can


sometimes be just as bad as not having one at all.” Clarke Willmott are helping people with wills by


developing an online ‘Which Will?’ tool that prompts the user to think about what is important to them when making a will, and recommends which will best meets their needs. Ms Cummins added: “Having a will is one of those


tedious admin jobs that sometimes we never get around to, perhaps because we have no idea where to start. “We really hope this campaign will give people the


motivation, especially while we are all spending a greater amount of time at home, to just get it ticked off the list.”


Carol Cummins: Find time for making a will


Commendation for Covid support


A national recruitment agency owned by the University of Warwick has received praise from Worcestershire County Council for its role in reducing the spread of Covid-19 across the West Midlands. Unitemps has been commended


for its rapid deployment of temporary staff across multiple lateral flow testing sites, which it says has made a ‘tangible impact’ on reducing the spread of Covid-19. Worcestershire’s director of


public health, Dr Kathryn Cobain, has personally thanked Unitemps for its efforts, singling out business development manager Andrea Skelly for her work in recruiting an operational workforce within 24 hours to support an urgent council initiative. Lorna Bytheway, director at


Unitemps, said: “The recognition from Worcestershire County Council is testament to the team’s dedication during this challenging time, as we continue to adapt our services in response to the pandemic.” Unitemps has more than 20 years


of experience providing comprehensive recruitment services for a wide-range of organisations.


April 2021 CHAMBERLINK 33


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