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1813 Club and Premier Members


1813 Club and Premier Members


Greater Birmingham’s leading companies Security expert: Phil Bindley


Technology firm strengthens team


A Birmingham communications technology company, Intercity Technology, has bolstered its senior team with the appointment of Phil Bindley as the new managing director of its cloud and security division. Mr Bindley has joined Intercity


Technology after having worked for a number of other technology firms, including The Bunker, BlueChip and Anix Group. His background is in information


security and technology, and he has had roles in leadership, sales and service delivery. He said: “Working in this sector


for over 20 years has given me a wealth of experience in delivering technology security solutions and leading network transformation projects for a range of clients. “It is so important that as


providers we look to become the enabler for our customers, maintaining and delivering confidentiality, integrity and availability of data. “Cloud and security are major


growth areas for Intercity so I’m excited to use my knowledge and insight to help customers during this challenging period.” Andrew Jackson, CEO of


Intercity Technology, said: “During one of the most difficult periods for many organisations, Phil’s appointment strengthens the talent we have across our workforce and further supports the growth we have seen as an organisation over the past couple of years. “Under Phil’s stewardship, I look


forward to watching our cloud and security division develop and grow to meet the continued needs of our customers.”


32CHAMBERLINKApril 2021


A Midlands steel fabrications business - which is just one a few that makes lampposts – has been sold in a management buy-out. The firm is Sutton-in-Ashfield


based Fabrikat (Nottingham) Limited, a designer and fabricator of lighting columns and guardrails. Fabrikat was founded in 1985


and has an estimated 20 per cent of the UK market share of lampposts, and a near 50 per cent share of the guardrail market. The £12m turnover firm has


diversified in recent years into the area of decorative lighting poles and architectural metalwork, and it now has a 50 per cent share of the UK market in that as well. The firm also provides local authorities with services such as lighting-pole testing, geo-mapping and monitoring services. The business employs around 80


people across its design, manufacturing and marketing divisions. Its former owners, Martin Hopkins and Matthew Wass, have worked in the business for around 25 years, taking ownership in 2013 through a secondary and subsequent tertiary management buy-out.


The new owners are a buy-out


team which includes financial director Paul Allen, general manager Mick Scott and technical manager Melvin Batty who have together have clocked-up more 70 years service with Fabrikat. The MBO has been funded by


Duke Royalty Limited, who have taken a 30 per cent stake in the business. The sellers received finance advice


and assistance from the corporate team of Smith Cooper, led by partner John Farnsworth. He said: “Martin and Matt


recognised from the early days that the key to developing the business lay in setting a strong strategic plan and empowering the talented senior management team. “Few owners are able to get the


balance of control and devolved responsibility right, but in this case, it has produced an extremely strong business and the talented


management team that is now taking ownership.”


Steel deal: John Farnsworth


Premier Membership


Contact: Gary Birch T: 0845 6036650


Management buy-out at Midlands manufacturer


Martin Hopkins said: “Smith


Cooper’s advice carefully considered all available options, and timing of the deal was crucial. The advisors were supportive at every stage of the process, making the transaction smooth and straightforward.”


Cufflinks for charity milestone


Midlands Air Ambulance has marked its 30th anniversary by commissioning a limited edition run of cufflinks, designed and made by top Birmingham jeweller Deakin & Francis. Only 100 sets of the cufflinks have been created


by the seventh-generation jeweller. The cufflinks feature the charity’s ‘pulse’ logo. In addition, 100 lapel pins with the logo have been produced to go with the cufflinks. Henry Deakin, managing director of Deakin &


Francis, said: “The limited edition pulse collection, made in the Midlands for the Midlands, is a design we are particularly proud of, as the sale of every pair of cufflinks or lapel pin will directly help fund lifesaving air ambulance and critical care car missions in our region.”


Emma Gray, fundraising and marketing director for Midlands Air Ambulance Charity, adds: “While our heritage is two centuries behind that of Deakin & Francis, this is a fitting partnership for two organisations founded in the Midlands. “We are extremely grateful to Henry and James


Deakin and the whole team for supporting our pre- hospital emergency service by crafting such a beautiful collection to commemorate our 30th anniversary. “Their support and that of our buyers will help


fund future vitally important missions in our area as each pair sold will fund one of Midlands Air Ambulance Charity’s critical care car missions.” The cufflinks retail at £195, while the lapel pin


is £95.


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