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MOR bars in this paper. A data logger tag was used to ensure that the conditions remained as stated. The slurry formulations used in this paper can be found in Table 3. The MOR results mirrored the same


results seen in the previous paper. The initial increase from 1 to 2 hour drying intervals was observed again. The drying intervals of 4, 8 and 24 hours were similar and differences observed were negligible. Throughout this paper, a 4 hour


drying interval was set as a control to allow changes in the percentage in strength to be assessed. This method highlights the difference seen with drying intervals of 1 to 2 hours. It again shows how there were small changes in MOR strength for 2, 4, 8 and 24 hours. This trend mimics the findings in the original paper and confirms the findings albeit at different values. One other finding is that there


seems to be a 1 mm thickness difference seen between 1-hour dry time and the other sample sets. This could represent that the shell is so weak, that it strips previous stucco particles from the wet shell and reduces the overall thickness.


Polymer Enhanced Slurry Moving onto the polymer enhanced slurry, we will look at the MOR. As you can see in Figure 4, the presence of the polymer has the effect of increasing the green strength by approximately 60%, while decreasing the hot strength by approximately 35%. The MOR results for MOR Strength


versus the intercoat dry time is displayed within Figure 5. There is also the ability of the


polymer to improve drying properties of the shell, so as per earlier, we will use the 4 hour dry time as a standard, and review the strength development over time.


It can be seen there is a dramatic


difference in the strength development with the presence of a polymer within the matrix. Not only is green strength higher, but it develops this strength much quicker within the shell due to the presence of the polymer.


Material Remasol® AdBond® AdBond® Burst®


SP30 Ultra™ 100 Victawet® 12 Fused Silica 200 Mesh Polymer QuikSet™ Polymer


No Polymer Polymer Enhanced QuikSet 36.0% – –


31.5% 4.5% –


0.2% 0.9%


62.9% Table 3: Formulation for each slurry used.


0.2% 0.9%


62.9%


26.2% –


5.3% 0.2% 0.5%


67.8%


Figure 2: Percentage change in strength of no polymer shell system versus a 4-hour control


Figure 3: Thickness comparison of no polymer shell system at different intercoat dry Continued on p 22 times


November 2020 ❘ 21 ®


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