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96 INTERIORS


Why movement joints are vital F


luctuations in temperature and moisture cause movement in the subfloor and result in cracks


transferring to tile and stone coverings – or worse, cause a loss of bond between the covering and the substrate which can result in overall damage to the surface covering. For this reason, industry standards state that all tile and stone installations should include the use of movement joints. In many circumstances, movement joints


are overlooked or left to the contractor; however, a lack of movement joints can be a contributing factor to many different types of failure. Furthermore, if movement joints are not included in the specification, liability for any resulting problems (even if the problem doesn’t directly relate to a lack of movement joints) could fall to the architect, as it’s their responsibility to specify the type of joint and location of them. The question, however, is how do you


provide the movement joints necessary to ensure a durable installation and what movement joints should you use?


deflection movement, structural movement, moisture movement and thermal movement – will help when deciding which type of movement joint will best counteract the resulting stresses. In floors, there are two basic types of movement joints: structural and non- structural. Both types will be subject to different movement patterns – for example, whether movement will occur from the covering through to the floor slab or just in the covering assembly, and this will affect the type of joint needed to prevent damage. Pre-formed joints can accommodate


roughly 15-20 per cent of their movement zone. Schlüter®


-DILEX movement joints offer Movement joints have to go through


screed to the covering, with consideration to intermediate surface joints and therefore need to be designed into the specification. Understanding the types of movement that can occur – namely drying shrinkage, differential movement,


MMA Quartz or PU: what’s the right floor for you?


Choosing the right floor for a food and beverage facility is a tricky task, as it will have to withstand a long list of challenging onsite conditions while consistently maintaining a clean and hygienic environment. Knowing when to apply an MMA quartz or PU requires understanding the floor’s properties as well as what chemicals, impacts, traffic, temperatures and cleaning it will encounter. PUs are typically two-component systems (a resin and a hardener) that when brought together undergo a process of stoichiometric curing to form a solid layer. In contrast, MMAs work by using a catalyst to trigger a reaction that creates a single monolithic mass fused to the substrate. Both formulations have a textured finish, which enhances traction underfoot and helps to cut down on slips and trips in working environments that are often prone to wet conditions, spillages and frequent washes. The size and type of aggregates incorporated into a PU or MMA floor are often tailored to meet the required cleanability/slip resistance balance. This was the case at McVitie’s production facility in Glasgow, which used Flowcrete’s solvent-free, heavy duty polyurethane system Flowfresh RT in two different textures.


01270 753000 www.flowcrete.co.uk Fly Forbo winning design paves the way for the future of banking


The versatile and contemporary aesthetics of Forbo Flooring Systems’ portfolio has led to an array of its floor coverings being installed at the UK’s first-ever Halifax flagship branch. The state-of-the-art project has been awarded top honours in the annual Fly Forbo 2018/19 competition. Designed by leading retail and brand consultancy firm, Honest, the 13,500 sq ft Halifax branch located on Oxford Street in Central London, replaces the former Dorothy Perkins and Burton flagship store. Spanning over three floors and split into different zones, the interior design incorporates vibrant colours and inviting furnishings to create a welcoming and homely environment. Michelle Hardy, Senior Creative at Honest, said: “We visited the Forbo showroom in Clerkenwell, which was the ideal source of inspiration, as we needed hardwearing, comfortable and contemporary floor coverings that would denote spaces without being overwhelming. Working closely with and utilising the knowledge and guidance of our Forbo Key Account Manager, we were able to identify an array of products from Forbo’s portfolio that would help us to meet our objectives.”


www.forbo-flooring.co.uk/flyforbo www.forbo-flooring.co.uk/retail


complete protection and are available to specifiers in a wide selection of materials, colours, and movement capability. Schlüter-Systems Ltd has NBS Clauses and


BIM Objects available on NBS Plus, National BIM Library and at the company’s website.


01530 813396 www.schluterspecifier.co.uk


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


ADF SEPTEMBER 2019


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