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HEALTHCARE ESTATES SHOW PREVIEW


49


Where innovation, technology and leadership meet


Set to be the biggest event in its history, Healthcare Estates takes place in October at Manchester Central, with an expected 240+ exhibitors and over 4,500 attendees. This year the event has the themes of ‘Fund, Design, Build, Manage & Maintain,’ and new for 2019 it is hosting the IFHE (Europe), and including content to attract an international delegate base


H


ealthcare Estates’ busy visitors and delegates set aside valuable time to find solutions to the challenges


they face on a daily basis, and keep up to date with the latest product innovations. This year’s conference programme has something for everyone. With the show hosting the International Federation of Hospital Engineering, experts on healthcare estate management, healthcare engineering, and the healthcare architecture and construction supply chain from all over the world will speak both at the conference itself, and during a dedicated afternoon session in the new Plenary theatre.


Streams & keynotes


The annual conference will have four streams – Strategy and Leadership, Engineering and Facilities Management, Planning, Design and Construction, and Innovation. The exhibition and conference also have a new look, with a Plenary Theatre in the exhibition hall, where keynote presentations will be given at the start of each day. The keynote sessions are free to attend for delegates, exhibitors, ‘VIPs’, speakers, and apprentices. This year’s keynote speakers are: • 8 October – Simon Corben, director and head of profession, NHS Estates and Facilities, NHS Improvement, and Alasdair Coates, CEO of the Engineering Council.


• 9 October – Professor Michail Kagioglou, Dean of the University of Huddersfield,


ADF SEPTEMBER 2019


and Alan Sharp, CEO at the Mater Hospital in Dublin. The ‘motivational speaker’ will be Sally Becker, the ‘Angel of Mostar’.


The conference is the paid for element of the event, which entitles you free access to all sessions including the exhibition and theatre sessions. With this year’s Healthcare Estates event hosting the IFHE, the afternoon of 9th October will feature – in a dedicated session in the Plenary theatre – international case studies and content from the US, the Falkland Islands, Germany, and Ireland, covering exemplars in hospital design, energy saving, and facilities management.


Exhibition theatres


Seven exhibition theatres will give visitors plenty of opportunity to catch up on the latest products, regulations, and best practice. The exhibition and theatres are free to attend as a visitor (however, visitors do not have access to the conference which is paid for). The theatres are: •Design and Construction Zone – featuring the latest project case studies, and findings from post-occupancy evaluation, sharing best practice in exemplar design and construction.


•HVAC & Engineering Theatre – sponsored by SolXEnergy.


•Water & Infection Control Zone – run by The Water Management Society.


Award-winning product design company, Safehinge Primera has developed a


range of doorsets and locksets to


help reduce the risk of suicide in inpatient environments. At first sight their products might look similar to others on the market, but look more closely and you’ll discover crucial design details that could help you save a life. Stand number E7.


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


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