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38 PROJECT REPORT: HEALTHCARE BUILDINGS


ABOVE


The building’s design provides a generous link from outpatients in the ground floor back to to the existing Christie Hospital


As a result, the entire ground floor is given over to outpatients, except for a separate front door and reception for proton beam patients – leading to an information area and glazed meeting room – as well as the main stair and lift up to the first floor waiting area. For outpatients, there is a link to the main hospital to the rear of the unit, which “maximises that connection,” says the architect, “a well-lit, really wide link corridor that ties back to the hospital street and dining room, which is used by outpatients and staff.”


Outpatients provision is dramatically improved, with rooms now all HBN compliant when some had previously been very cramped. The architects also redesigned existing outpatients space to provide a more suitable area for the service, with the overall provision essentially doubling in size.


As one side of the building sits along the concrete bunker, access to natural daylight is limited, therefore all consultant and waiting spaces are grouped around the external glazed walls opposite. More private outpatient exam rooms are located to the centre of the building.


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Proton beam levels


The layout is efficient for staff but also straightforward for proton beam patients. After ascending from the separate entrance, they come into the main reception on the first floor (the main treatment level), and turn left for the adult and teenage waiting space, or right for paediatrics – which takes up roughly two-thirds of the support spaces on this level.


“The clinical flows are all very discreet, from anaesthetic to recovery,” says Covington, and the concise plan makes them as short as possible. The layout was informed by the need for safeguarding children through separate clinical flows from adult patients (in addition to their distinct clinical needs such as for anaesthetics and recovery). Adults have a fully-glazed, double-height


space, which “took cues from Maggie’s Centres,” in terms of not only its spatial quality, but the amenities on offer to provide a few home comforts. “They’ll be here every day for weeks, so we provided a little kitchen area to give a bit of a domestic feel. Also we wanted it to be social so they can share their experiences with other patients, because they’ll see the same faces.”


ADF SEPTEMBER 2019


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