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40 PROJECT REPORT: HEALTHCARE BUILDINGS


local suppliers and “standard yet robust” components were used wherever possible. The exterior is relatively sober, with a champagne-coloured anodised aluminium rainscreen, breaking up the darker cladding of adjacent buildings. However the high-tech nature of the building is signalled by a continuation of The Christie’s language of LED strips at high level, and to the rear the concrete slab at ground level is glazed and enhanced with the geometric graphics, and backlit.


A key structural challenge was presented


to Arup to ensure that radiation does not leak out as the proton beam is pushed down a vacuum pipe from the linear accelerator, and guided using electromagnets to each gantry. This pipe extends to a


fourth room with a fixed beam which will be used for research into future use of the technology.


This meant that the individual pours making up the immense volumes of concrete in this building needed to be carefully sequenced, so they interlocked seamlessly in order to protect spaces outside. Covington explains: “Each pour needed to key in to the next so that you didn’t have joints in a straight line offering a path. The radiation can find the smallest cracks.”


The whole project was modelled in 3D, “down to the light switches.” BIM (using Revit) was also essential to coordination, “especially when we had three vendors,” says Covington. “We had four structural models – one for each of the gantries then another one for the rest of the building, plus six M&E models and four architectural models.”


Conclusion PROJECT FACTFILE


Client: The Christie NHS Foundation Trust Architect: HKS Structural engineer: Arup Proton beam vendor: Varian Floor area: 133,000 ft2 Start on site: 2015 Opened: April 2018


backprinted glass in lift lobbies – which change from trunk to branches as users ascend the levels. The glass interview rooms are fritted with geometric patterns which play off the sculpture in the main waiting area. For paediatrics, the client commissioned lively jungle-themed murals, including a ‘Proton Panda’ character who clinicians encourage children to spot.


Exterior & structural


The project was specified to a tight budget, partly due to the Procure21+ strictures, and


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


Funding for the research room had to come from donations, but luckily the client is “very successful” in this area, says Covington, however the efforts made to deliver this speak of the collaborative and engaged approach that characterises this project. For example, the project team climbed Kilimanjaro in 2017 (including Franko and HKS colleagues, plus members of The Christie Hospital’s project team, and several staff from Arup), raising an impressive £50K. This is just one example of the unprecedented contribution this project makes to UK healthcare, in terms of the high-tech treatment benefits, but also the way it treats patients as people first and foremost. The project’s final testimony is the patients’ reaction – a 10 year old boy who attended with his mum and liked it so much that he wanted to bring his dad back with him the next time. 


ADF SEPTEMBER 2019


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