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6 NEWS EVENTS


AWARDS Restaurant & Bar Awards 03 October, London www.restaurantandbardesignawards.com


Architecture MasterPrize 14 October, Spain www.architectureprize.com


EXHIBITIONS Open House


21 - 22 September, London www.openhouselondon.org.uk


FESTIVAL World Architecture Festival 04 - 06 December, Amsterdam www.worldarchitecturefestival.com


SEMINARS


Building Brum: On the Rise 19 September, Birmingham www.architecture.com/whats-on


TRADE SHOWS 100% Design 18 - 21 September, London www.100percentdesign.co.uk


Offsite Expo


24 - 25 September, Coventry www.offsite-expo.co.uk


Decorex International 06 - 09 October, London www.decorex.com


RESIDENTIAL


Architects turn Waltham Cross car park into apartment building


Todd Architects has submitted plans to redevelop an underused car park above a shopping centre in Waltham Cross, Hertfordshire, into 119 apartments. Totalling approximately 8,800 m2


, the


mix of one and two bed units, alongside a number of three bed family homes, will sit above The Pavilions Shopping Centre in the heart of the town. The homes will be contained in two blocks connected by exterior walkways, with internal amenity space and a landscaped roof terrace and garden, accessible to all residents. The architects’ design replaces the dated and visually cluttered facade, removing the “brooding” red brick and “establishing a light, clean palette with a gradation of tonal colour easing the structure into its surroundings,” commented the firm, as well as improving the backdrop for the nearby listed sculpture of Alexander of Abingdon. “Glass balustrades and glass-clad panels on the upper levels will play with the natural light and help articulate the building” said the architects. Expanded aluminium mesh will enliven the parking structure while a reconfigured retail area will include uniform shop fronts and a glazed entrance to the shopping centre.


External green spaces are a core element of the design, with landscaped areas and green roofs in an attempt to improve local bio-diversity as well as residents’ well


Visit 2019’s Great British Buildings RIBA


The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) has announced the programme for Great British Buildings 2019, which gives members of the public a rare chance to look around some of this year’s RIBA award-winning buildings. From London’s restored Battersea Arts


Centre, to the historic Hollis Building in Sheffield, Great British Buildings “invites people to explore the buildings crowned the UK’s best.”


The RIBA invites visitors to enjoy


“talks, tours and unique opportunities to meet the architects as they reveal the stories behind their buildings, what inspired them, and what makes their project an award-winner”. Commenting on the programme, RIBA president Ben Derbyshire said, “This year’s RIBA Awards have seen an exceptional range of projects, showcasing the UK’s great architectural ambition, innovation and skill. We’re really pleased to give the public this rare


being. The main roof garden is interspersed with semi-circular and irregular rounded planters which act as benches and create a meandering walk, while the roof terrace is designed with a mix of hard and soft landscaping, together with seating area, pergola, artificial lawn, games area and BBQ space.


chance to go behind the scenes and see first-hand what makes each building so special, with the return of our Great British Buildings programme.” Great British Buildings 2019 will run from September to November.


Battersea Arts Centre © Fred Howarth


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


ADF SEPTEMBER 2019


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