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56 STRUCTURAL ELEMENTS


assess – is ensuring correctly calculated U-values are in place for every project. In inverted roof systems, the Design Lambda value should always be used, as this takes into account the rainwater cooling effect. Not using the declared Lambda value means the insulation will not meet the U-value requirements.


Changes to flat roof guidance Architects should also be aware of recent changes to one of the key British Standards for roofing. BS 6229:2018 – ‘flat roofs with continuously supported flexible waterproof coverings’ – Code of Practice was published at the end of last year.


It describes best practice in the design, construction, care and maintenance of roofs with a flat or curved surface, at a pitch no greater than 10˚, with a continuously supported flexible waterproof covering. The guidance reflects the fact the flat roof industry has evolved significantly over the last 15 years, with new challenges driven by Building Regulations and fire requirements, as well as new materials and systems. With the progress of Part L of the Building Regulations and the requirement for more thermal insulation, the new


In the last decade, the liquids sector has rapidly grown, which has attracted more manufacturers into the market – it is important for specifiers to select products, which have independent accreditations


standard recommends the use of warm and inverted roofs and advises against cold roofs. This is because of the difficulty of forming and maintaining an effective air and vapour control layer below the insulation and of providing sufficient cross ventilation above the insulation. There is also a section providing advice on maintaining the thermal performance of inverted roofs. As Part L evolves, this is becoming more important, and long-term results will be under close scrutiny.


Sarah Spink is CEO of the Liquid Roofing and Waterproofing Association (LRWA)


DML Expanded Metal Lathing –


ARCHITECTS DATAFILE IS INDEPENDENTLY VERIFIED BY ABC


Hits 100,000 Sheets a year! Simpson Strong-Tie is celebrating the production of its one hundred thousandth ‘ DML’ Expanded Metal Lathing sheet. The UK’s most versatile, reinforcement mesh option, available in a sheet size of 2,400 x 700 x 0.40. The bead and mesh range from Simpson Strong-Tie is going from strength to strength, increasing in popularity as builders opt for a solution to suit a wider variety of applications. UK Marketing Manager, Kyle Perry explains: “Our DML is something of a fan favourite; used as a general purpose reinforcement mesh, helping prevent cracking occur, when different materials meet. We can also provide this galvanised for internal use or stainless steel to fight those unforgiving weather conditions externally. Made in the UK at our head office and manufacturing facility in Tamworth, it’s a marvel and a joy to watch the efficiency these are being made with by our very skilled team – making the DML an easy fit for most situations. The rate we’re making them, we will be producing enough DML next year to go from our head office to Edinburgh, Scotland!’’


01827 255 600 www.strongtie.co.uk


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


ADF SEPTEMBER 2019


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