search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
PROJECT REPORT: HEALTHCARE BUILDINGS


There is an artificial tree in a planter – as a result of infection control requirements for immune-compromised patients – attractive ‘natural’ bent timber seating, and a large geometric artwork by Acrylicize suspended from the ceiling, promoting the nature theme by resembling a tree canopy, as well as providing acoustic benefits. Perforated external aluminium vertical fins help to add to the tree canopy effect, dappling light into the space, while ameliorating solar gain. Teenagers have their own waiting area


here, designed with advice from the Teenager Cancer Trust, with a teen-friendly sofa plus TV and gaming consoles. “They have space to hang out and be teenagers, it’s nice they have the ability to retreat somewhere,” says Covington.


Also on this level are control rooms for the proton beam equipment, including a full time base for Varian staff to monitor the gantries and particle accelerator, as well as a control room for treatment spaces that’s run by clinical staff. Level 2 is ‘pretreatment’ – including rooms where patients are interviewed and examined a few days before treatment, or where bloods may be taken – here is also a mezzanine overlooking the main waiting space. There’s a similar layout to level 1 in terms of adult/paediatric waiting, and off the latter is a landscaped external play courtyard, featuring light-reflecting porcelain tiles, and timber seating. Covington says that the courtyard had to start at level 2 rather than the level below “because so much support space was needed there,” however it has the benefit of shorter walls as a result. With levels 2 and 3 mainly containing office/admin, it brings valuable natural daylight into middle of the floor plan to benefit staff wellness. The main treatment planning space, comprising around 20 workstations, is located here – where staff can ‘model’ tumours and decide how to treat them, plus physics and oncologists’ offices. “Clinical staff really like it because there’s natural daylight into all office spaces,” says Covington. There’s also a small terrace where adult patients can get some air, its access separate from the paediatric area. Where not given over to air handling rooms and power rooms sitting above the proton beam gantries, space on Level 3 houses a range of office accommodation. There are also multi-disciplinary meeting rooms which function as lecture halls, set up for visiting oncologists and radiation specialists, who can link audio/visually to universities and help further knowledge of


ADF SEPTEMBER 2019


39


proton beam and its future uses in healthcare. Level 4 is currently shell space, but has been specified for future inpatient use when the client requires. In terms of artwork, the architects designed nature-themed elements such as kitchen splashbacks and tree-themed vinyl


CLADDING CONTRASTS The building’s exterior is relatively sober, with a champagne-coloured anodised aluminium rainscreen, breaking up the darker cladding of adjacent buildings All images © The Christie


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108