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16 VIEWS


We are also inevitably shaping a social


landscape; impacting on the ability of individuals and communities to live healthy, happy lives; we are either creating


opportunities for people, or we are taking them away


biologically programmed to be on edge around hard angles, while soft and curvy spaces put us at ease.


All of these studies have come to the same conclusion. When we shape the physical world, we are also inevitably shaping a social landscape; we are impacting on the ability of individuals and communities to live healthy, happy lives; we are either creating opportunities for people, or we are taking them away. Legislation has followed suit, setting out the new standards that professionals in the built environment industry are expected to


meet. In 2012, the Public Services (Social Value) Act was introduced, and in 2015, the United Nations released the 17 Sustainable Development Goals. The former calls for all public sector commissions to consider wider economic, social, and environmental conditions. The latter is a universal call to action to end poverty, protect the planet, and ensure that people enjoy peace and prosperity. These issues may seem a little too ambitious to tackle with a simple building or infrastructure project. However, with nine out of ten people in the UK living in built-up areas, and with clear connections between the built environment and people’s physical and mental wellbeing, every project must endeavour to make a positive difference. We must deliver ‘social value’. Social value is commonly described as a ‘triple-bottom line’ that considers social, economic, and environmental impact, from a community perspective. It is a concept that summarises the responsibility of the building industry to consider the wider repercussions of a project on people, for all of the reasons outlined above. To achieve this, we need to embed ourselves in communities, listening to their


NEW ARRIVALS


Rounding up the latest movers and in-house appointments across the industry


DAVID FOSTER LK2


(L-R) Sara Bayer, Joe Moyer, and Jen Stencel © Magnusson Architecture + Planning


THREE NEW ASSOCIATE PRINCIPALS MAGNUSSON ARCHITECTURE AND PLANNING (MAP)


Magnusson Architecture and Planning (MAP) have announced the promotions of three Senior Associates – Sara Bayer, Joe Moyer and Jen Stencel – who will be joining Chris Jones as Associate Principals. The four will continue to manage many of the firm’s projects and teams, “while expanding their capacity and ability to deliver high quality client experiences and design work,” said the practice. It added: “They have been integral to the firm’s recent successes.” Together, Bayer, Moyer and Stencel have more than 40 years of experience and expertise in all aspects of design and construction administration. “Individually they have been responsible for producing award-winning projects, deploying innovative technologies and assuring the timely completion of healthy, beautiful, affordable and supportive housing developments, all hallmarks of MAP’s work.”


LK2 have appointed a new architect to join its team to support the delivery of a number of high-profile projects. David Foster has taken up the role at LK2 after working on several schemes across the UK including cinemas, residential developments and retail units. David said, “I’m delighted to have joined LK2 at an exciting period of growth for the business. The unique blend of LK2’s commercial architecture and sport and leisure consultancy services very much appealed to me.” David will be working closely with LK2’s directors and project architects to develop concept designs into “technically proficient buildings from inception through to completion,” said the firm.


needs and wants, and redefine our idea of success accordingly, across all avenues of the building process. We have to build not to prove the strength of metal, but to support the strength of people. We have to design spaces that optimise natural light as well as social encounters. When we build roads, we have to consider both what they connect and who they divide. A facade has to protect the inhabitants of the building from poor weather and make the passing pedestrians feel safe and welcome. Everything we have learned to do has to do more. To add meaningful social value to our projects, we have to design with people at the very heart of the process and at the forefront of decision-making. It can be complicated, because as much as we try to calibrate, calculate, and validate the wider societal impacts of buildings, places, and infrastructure, we will never be able to fully capture the value of human experiences in a spreadsheet. However, we have another unifying factor within our industry; we like a challenge. That’s why we build.


Camilla Siggaard Andersen is design lead at Arup Digital Studio


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


ADF SEPTEMBER 2019


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