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NEWS AIRPORT


Referendum forces Fosters’ Mexico airport cancellation


the site, the former Texcoco lake bed. Just over 1 million people voted, only around one out of every 90 registered Mexican voters. Obrador had pledged to cancel the project during his election campaign, “claiming it was marred by overspending and corruption,” reported Associated Press. The president-elect said Mexicans will save $5bn by abandoning the project. The Texcoco project was initiated by current Mexican president Pena Nieto as his signature infrastructure project, however critics said it was initiated with “little real environmental study.” Obrador called the decision “a triumph for the environmental movement”.


Following a referendum in Mexico, the country’s president elect Andres Musel Lopez Obrador has promised to cancel the $13bn airport project under construction in Mexico City, which has been designed by Foster + Partners.


AWARDS


Cranfield’s AIRC Centre stays on top


CPMG Architects’ multi-award-winning project – the Aerospace Integration Research Centre (AIRC) at Cranfield University – has scooped another award – this time at the LABC (Local Authority Building Control) Grand Finals. The design team was recognised in the Best Large Commercial Project award category for its work in delivering the £35m centre, which “successfully supports the building’s commercial purpose and is sensitive to the local environment,” said the judges.


This recognition comes after the project team for CPMG picked up a regional RICS Design Through Innovation Award for the scheme.


After 70 per cent of the turnout voted against the plan, Obrador commented: “The decision taken by the citizens is democratic, rational and efficient.” The project had already begun in earnest, with substantial foundations having been dug on


However there have been objections to making such a decision by using a referendum. The Mexican Confederation of Chambers of Commerce said: “It should be a technical and financial decision, not a politician one based on a popular vote.” According to reports, local architects have reacted angrily to the decision to cancel the project based on a public vote. Dezeen quoted one, Fernanda Canales, who accused the referendum, of being “fake” and “against the law,” adding that “it was not a transparent process.”


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Nick Gregory, director for CPMG said:


“The Aerospace Integration Research Centre is a flagship scheme that we are incredibly proud of. It has had a positive impact on the future of aircraft design and we are delighted to have been a part of the team that has made it so successful.” “The success of the AIRC Centre has led to us working further with Cranfield


University as they make plans to expand their estate with a new Agri-informatics building and a Water Sciences building.” The project team included main contractor RG Carter, Couch Perry Wilkes (M&E consultants), Stewart Morris Partnership (structural engineers), Currie & Brown (project managers) and Gardiner & Theobald (QS).


ADF DECEMBER 2018


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