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46 PROJECT REPORT: RETAIL BUILDINGS


POROUS


The building has a porous, detailed facade, as well as glazing that reduces solar gain All images © Donal Murphy Photography


The showroom also hosts a fast-charging vehicle facility for both duel fuel and electric models. “The site is future proofed for the roll out of fully electric E-Tron cars,” says Mac Dermott, “with a dedicated electrical sub-station plus AC and DC charging stations in place.”


PROJECT SUPPLIERS Cladding: Kingspan


Aluminium honeycomb facade: AWF Vertriebs GMBH Curtain walling: Schueco UK, Mealey Architectural Facades Specialised doors: Butzbach Metal ceilings: Durlum Floor tiles: Mazzari Specialist lighting: Siteco Furniture: Isaria Workshop equipment: Maha Escalator & lift: Kone


A sustainable urban drainage system for managing storm-water has been implemented across the project, with elements such as a green roof, rainwater harvesting, permeable paving and bio-retention pond implements. As for the project’s exterior, Mac Dermott tells ADF: “The building envelope was designed to take maximum account of solar aspects to achieve low energy requirements for summer cooling.” He continues: “The enhanced glazing solution actively reduces solar gain, while maximising light transmission and reducing solar glare.” This system further benefits the internal environment and the building energy consumption by reducing heat loss with enhanced u-value.


Award winning


According to project architect Mac Dermott, the building was “very well received” by the client and customers, with the project winning the 2018 Irish Construction Industry ‘Retail Project of the Year.’ The judges were reportedly impressed with the approach taken towards the initial planning stages, as well as the


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building’s environmental credentials, and the fact that the facility produces a retail experience closer to that of a high street shop, as opposed to the ‘out of town business park’ ambience common among car dealerships. Donal Duggan, general manager at the Audi Centre, has commented on the award, including on the reasons why he believes it was made: “When we started the planning phase of this magnificent building, our aim was to make it a modern retail space that customers could feel comfortable in, so to have won this award in a category that included names that you would traditionally find on the high street is a real achievement for us. “With features such as our own electricity supply providing power to our EV charging stations, we have future proofed the site for years to come. We are really proud to receive this award, which is a real testament to the hard work of everyone involved.” For the large majority of its customers, a visit to the car dealership is a once-in-a- few-years event, whether to purchase their car, or to possibly have a costly repair. Because of this, it inherently constitutes an unfamiliar, somewhat daunting place. While some similar projects perhaps don’t do a lot to alleviate this, EMD architects have succeeded instead in making the building comfortable and welcoming, so that on each visit, the customer can feel much more at home. 


ADF DECEMBER 2018


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