search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
PROJECT REPORT: EDUCATION & RESEARCH FACILITIES


It’s not a true timber building – the upstairs floor needed to be of concrete due to compliance with BB98 acoustics standards for learning environments. Reverberation times in the capacious 5 metre first floor ceiling have been reduced using acoustic panels around the trusses, and there are suspended baffles downstairs. The building’s key external design statement comes from the way the roof cantilevers over the terrace to provide five triangular overhangs, their trusses pointing outwards towards the cricket pitch. Naturally continuing the rhythm from inside but with soffits of larch, they protect a good part of the terrace – enabling decent numbers to gather for cricket matches and other events. The architects and client hope that thanks to the overhanging roof, future art classes could also potentially take place outside. All classrooms lead out on to either the front terrace or the external ground floor circulation. During the design process, a flight of stairs was added to the terrace leading down to the toilets in the existing building. This was requested by the headmaster, reportedly telling the architects: “When kids need to go, they really need to go.”


While the timber frame had to be covered up to a large extent internally due to acoustics and fire issues, externally the building is pretty much exclusively faced in timber. The Siberian larch’s warm orange will silver over time which will help the facades blend harmoniously with the surrounding buildings.


Classrooms


Eight classrooms are provided in total – three science labs and a design and technology (DT) room have been located on the ground floor due to their more highly serviced nature. On the first floor, a looser-fit set of classrooms is provided – three for art and one for home economics – the latter sitting above DT. The art rooms are separated by partitions which can be removed, creating a huge space for events such as art exhibitions and end of term presentations. Leading onto the terrace, home economics has already been used to provide food for gatherings on the terrace. The rooms are exceptionally airy and spacious, with a floor to soffit height of 3.2 metres thanks to all surfaces being exposed. With the absence of a corridor, daylight comes in from large windows on both north and south elevations, also providing natural ventilation and excellent


ADF DECEMBER 2018


33


views. Andrew Baker-Falkner comments that in the case of the DT room, the headmaster wanted ample surface space – not only for the various machines used, but also for pupil design work to take place: “the client was as focused on the design as the making.” The benches have been created by pupils themselves, as a demonstration of their skills. The science labs are equally impressive, with reconfigurable desk ‘islands’ for pupils to sit in small groups. Andrew Baker-Falkner comments: “The spaces cater for new ways of teaching – previously shoehorned into old buildings – they never really had a building that was designed from the outset to do what they wanted to do.” He adds: “They wanted to have a very flexible building as they didn’t know how they were going to be teaching science in five or 10 years’ time.” ‘The art rooms upstairs also provide a great amount of flexibility due to the removable partitions, and like the science rooms, also have storage areas along the south elevation – one containing a kiln. However it’s the combination of natural light from dual aspect floor-to- ceiling windows, and the dynamic forms of the roof trusses that makes these rooms great places for pupils to learn, and also be fully aware of how their building is constructed.


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84