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10 NEWS BOOK


Desire Lines – an argument for “human-centred” design


New from RIBA Publishing and author Lesley Malone, ‘Desire Lines’ argues for “human-centred design” and seeks to “motivate place-makers to design spaces that people really want and need”.


A practical guide covering evidence-based approaches that architects, urban designers and landscape architects can use to achieve design that aligns with people’s desire lines, this book “will be useful and insightful to anyone in the business of designing public space, and an indispensable guide for those studying,” said RIBA. Working under the philosophy that community engagement should be a worthwhile and positive experience for all involved, ‘Desire Lines’ centres the needs of the end user, and the value of community collaboration throughout the design process. It covers public consultations and how to run them, “bringing social research principles to a wide range of engagement processes to help practitioners make the most of local knowledge and community experience for the benefit of design”. Providing direction for managing community participation, the book “encourages designers to think like social researchers,” an area in which the author specialises. It includes methodologies for gathering, analysing and interpreting information, examines different approaches for different projects and groups, effectively explains when and how to use surveys and quantitative methods, and discusses how to gather and analyse qualitative data. ‘Desire Lines’, said RIBA, “equips readers with essential practice guidance in an area that is rarely taught and is not covered in existing literature”.


TRANSPORT


Designs revealed for Liverpool’s new cruise liner terminal


The project team behind the design of the new cruise liner terminal in Liverpool have revealed the latest designs for scheme, which received outline planning permission in April.


The new cruise terminal is being built within the Liverpool Waters area and includes a “state of the art” passenger and baggage facility, complete with security checking and customs areas, lounge, cafe, toilets, taxi rank, vehicle pick up point, car park and four-star hotel.


The project team includes Ramboll as lead consultant, and architects Stride Treglown as “architect sub-consultants, and JLL and Turner & Townsend as “major sub-consultants”. Joyce Brady, project director at Ramboll said, “This is a major regeneration project for Liverpool City Council and their partners, which will play an important role in growing Liverpool’s tourist numbers. Our team are looking forward to seeing the scheme through its construction stage and into operation and accepting ships.” The ‘reveal’ of the latest designs for the


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


cruise terminal follows consultation events to support the pre-planning application for the new four-star hotel on the new cruise terminal site, which Wates have been appointed to construct. Steve Rotheram, Metro Mayor of the


Liverpool City Region, said: “The new cruise liner terminal is a key element in plans to further boost our flourishing visitor economy, which is now worth more than £4.5bn a year to the city region’s economy and provides more than 53,000 jobs. Attracting more visitors, in bigger ships, will give a boost not just to businesses in the city centre, but around the city region, indirectly creating additional jobs for local people across the supply chain.”


Site preparation works for the new facilities are expected to start in the new year, subject to approval of the Harbour Revision Order.


The city council has applied through Mersey Docks and Harbour Company for a Harbour Revision Order for the construction of the jetty in the Mersey.


ADF DECEMBER 2018


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