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26 • August 2018 • UPBEAT TIMES, INC.


Living the Upbeat Life! A Salute Q by Marcia Singer of Santa Rosa, CA. ~ www.lovearts.info ~ lovearts@att.net


: Have you always liked words or play- ing


around with words? Curious.


A: Pretty much. My dad was a lexophile for sure, loved learn- ing new words, and I inherited the gene. Here’s a poem I wrote around 1980, in North


Hollywood,


about my strange proclivity.


A Word Kind of Person:


It’s an absurd kind of person who’s a word kind of person, Who’s addicted to those symbols of our speech. Who can wile away the day, merely choosing if to say, Shall I beg, implore you, ask you or beseech? I get a band outta slang, ‘though it riles the local


gang Who’d rather stop and pop an icy brew or two.


I’ll


pass on the imbibing –rath- er get off on transcribing A French rondel or Japanese hai- ku. We bards can be quite per- versely occupied with modern verse, We’re quick to pick apart a line of any kind. With reck- less, rapt expression, I confess my own obsession with any anapestic, catalectric fi nd. Now that I’ve joshed, joked and jested –also tried, critiqued and tested line


every stanza, and foot


herein set down: Won’t you join me in the chorus, “I’m in love with my thesaurus,” may it bring me fame, distinction and renown. Ha! I still have lexophilia, I’m still choosy about what words


to use in speaking or writing, still interested in learning new expressions that expand my world view.


I love making


up expressions, too, coining phrases, and coming up with clever headlines! And, I have to admit I really appreciate a good pun! In a joke, or just in a sentence or two. Below, I’ve listed a few I’ve accumulated over the years. Some have ap- peared in the Upbeat Times in past issues: still, I hope some make you grin or laugh and I’m glad I’m far enough away that I can’t hear you on the groaners.


1. Police were called to a day care, where a three- year-old was resisting a rest. 2. The roundest knight at King Arthur’s round table was Sir Cumference. 3. When fi sh are in schools they sometimes take debate. 4. The short fortune teller who escaped from prison was a small medium at large.


5. A thief fell and broke his leg in wet cement. He became a hard ened criminal.


6. When the smog lifts in Los Angeles, U. C. L. A. 7. The dead batteries were given out free of charge.


8. If you take a laptop computer


The Upbeat Times Entertains, Educates & Inspires! ... continued from page 25


for a run you could jog your memory.


9. A dentist and a manicurist fought tooth and nail.


10. A backward poet writes in verse.


11. A chicken crossing the road is poultry in motion. 12. If you don’t pay your exor- cist you can get repossessed. 13. With her marriage she got a new name and a dress.


14. You are stuck with your debt if you can’t budge it.


15. He broke into song because he couldn’t fi nd the key. 16. He had a photographic memory which was never de- veloped. 17. A plateau is a high form of fl attery.


18. Those who get too big for their britches will be exposed in the end. 19. Santa’s helpers are subordi- nate clauses.


20. Acupuncture is a jab well done.


21. A lot of money is tainted: ‘Taint yours, and ‘taint mine.


In a word, here’s to all us “lexophiles” out there, shin- ing deLight with words, in oh so many languages, around the world. ~ XOMarcia


DOG PIC’s!


fornia style and sense of hu- mor though, and they fi gured he could have his 15 minutes of long shot fame because he’d never be there again. Besides, Barbara said they had all the recognition they’d ever need when boxes of fan letters and crayon drawings of Cav from Forestville Elementary School (next door to Vine Hill Ranch) started coming in telling the big horse “to win for them” and he was “their hero.” If Barbara could have, she would have loaded all of Sonoma County into a big van and brought us with them to Lexington for the race because she wanted every- one to experience their joy of being there with Cav. Sonoma County folks did get to feel they were there with the Wal- ters, as the Press Democrat’s delightful writer Bob Padecky cranked out daily dispatches for the folks back home, and everyone from radio stations to the crowd at the small town cafe was talking about Cav. May 4, 1996 at Churchill


Chris Parr of Forestville


shares the best Dog picture ever! Cooper the Dog!


26 • August 2018 • UPBEAT TIMES, INC.


Downs was greeted with bright sun, a dry track, and a phenom- enal crowd of over 142,000 people in attendance for the 122nd running of the Kentucky Derby. As 19 horses made their way to the starting gate, Sonoma County’s blue-collar horse was wearing number 3 as he paraded past a cavalcade of colorful outfi ts and mint julips. For the biggest stage of his life Cavonnier was ready; ears up, head high…the only horse in history to have ever come to the Kentucky Derby by way of the Sonoma County Fair. If he was nervous he wasn’t showing it, and neither was McCarron. The Walters were there with an excited crowd of friends and family that included their priest (and I’m sure Bar- bara would say why not bring your priest?). Back home the Santa Rosa Jockey Club was packed beyond capacity, So- noma County wanted to cheer


... continued on page 28 “Some beautiful paths can’t be discovered without getting lost.” ~ Erol Ozan


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