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MEMBERNEWS Report reveals growth in top companies


The East Midlands’ 200 top performing businesses have grown profits by an average 35% and employment by eight per cent, and together provide more than 48,000 jobs, according to the findings of the East Midlands Top 200 Report 2018 produced by the regional office of business and financial adviser and Chamber member Grant Thornton UK LLP in partnership with the CBI. Taking second place for profit


growth in the report, now in its sixth year, is Chamber member G.F. Tomlinson. Of the 200 businesses in the


report, 60 are based in each of Leicestershire and Nottinghamshire, 44 in Derbyshire, and 36 in Lincolnshire. Commenting on the East Midlands


Top 200 Report 2018, Mark Pashley, Director at Grant Thornton’s East Midlands regional office, said: “The 200 companies making it onto our list this year are a great example of what the East Midlands has to offer, and showcase the strength of our local economy. They show that overall, the East Midlands continues to perform strongly for business growth compared to the rest of the UK.


The launch of Grant Thornton’s East Midlands Top 200 Report 2018 : L-R: Richard Blackmore, CBI, Tom Copson, Grant Thornton and Mark Pashley, Grant Thornton


“While businesses continue to be


unsettled by the lack of information around the UK’s future trading relations with the EU and other economies, our data suggests that


many East Midlands businesses are getting on and making positive decisions, which bodes well for their future growth and the prosperity of the region.


“More than three-quarters of the


top 200 are mid-sized businesses from a range of market sectors and industries that illustrate the region’s impressive economic diversity.”


Established over 70 years ago, Leicester-based engineering business, Welham Motor Company continues to strive for growth. The business, which repairs and rebuilds all types of diesel engines particularly for buses, coaches, boats and locomotives, has received £15,000 in grant funding from the Collaborate project.


Welham Motors was established in 1947 by Ken and Vera Welham. Today the business trades throughout the UK and specialises in the reconditioning of engine components.


The Collaborate grant has contributed towards the purchase of a Rottler F10A CNC cylinder boring machine. The grant will also create jobs, as the operators will have more time to train other team members.


Finance Director David Cram said: “To stay competitive we have to keep investing in new machinery. Having access to the grant is going to make a real difference to the delivery of our service.”


Leicester City Council is the accountable body for Collaborate. Sukhbinder Basra, Collaborate Grant Manager at the council, said: “We are pleased to support Welham Motor Company with this grant funding, as more and more businesses realise the value of the advice and funding available.”


Eligible businesses in Leicester and Leicestershire can access capital grants from £5,000 to £25,000 for a third of the cost of projects, in addition to free sector-specific workshops and one-to-one business advice.


Collaborate is funded by the European Regional Development Fund and partner organisations from Leicester City Council, Leicestershire County Council, East Midlands Chamber and the Food and Drink Forum.


business network June 2018


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