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‘Just Chillin’


Santa Rosa, CA. ~ For goofy fun, perhaps you might choose to tor- ture your guests with a couple of “golden oldie” terms and phrases. All right— it is April Fool’s time, to act silly universally. Lexophiles


adore puns and twisting words—un- til it hurts!


Some of my great friends like to hear me groan, I guess, since I’ve been sent this list so oſt en. For example: “You can tune a piano, but you can’t tuna fi sh.” And “To write with a broken pencil is pointless.” I admit these make me laugh:


“When the smog liſt s in Los An- geles, U.C. L. A.” And, “A boiled egg is hard to beat.” Also, “A bi- cycle can’t stand alone; it’s just two tired.” On the mean side are: “He had a photographic memory which was never developed.” And, “T ose who get too big for their pants will be totally ex- posed in the end.” But, “When a clock is hungry it goes back four seconds.”


Is this what Daylight


Savings Time does to folks? How about fi guring out what these seven words all have in common? : Banana, Dresser, Grammar, Po- tato, and Revive? –If you swiſt ly said each has 2 double letters…


When I was teaching, it was as-


sumed that there are over 900,000 words in English. Hmmm. May- be that’s why some should not say “I’m at a loss for words.” English can be a frustrating language all right. Aſt er all, there is no egg in eggplant. No ham in hamburger. No apple in pineapple. English muffi ns were not an inspiration in England. And French fries were not made fi rst in France. Many writing colleagues over the years send me fun reminders: “If writers write why don’t fi ngers fi ng?” “If vegetarians eat vegeta-


This Is Probably Not A Good Time To Start Thinking About A Will!


rio, short-grain rice comes from the Piedmont region of Italy, in the Po Valley, about 40 miles from Turin. It is also grown in


A LITTLE HISTORY...& MORE! Arancini for Springtime! by Ellie Schmidt ~ eschmidt@upbeattimes.com


ooops. No. In each word listed, if you place the fi rst letter at the end of the word, then spell it back- wards, it will be the same word!


bles, what does a humanitarian eat?” Oh, enough of that! Here’s a recipe that some like more than pizza!!! Great Arbo-


Arkansas, California and Mis- souri. Because the cooked tex- ture is perfect for recipes such as risotto and rice pudding, it is superb in Arancini, a delicious treat that you can choose to fry or bake, even using leſt over rice from a previous meal. T ere are numerous regional versions of the dish. In Venice, they are fond of including fi nely chopped pro- sciutto ham. Some Sicilian reci- pes call for tucking ground meat and peas in the middle. T ese are traditionally shaped into round balls or cone shapes.


Arancini (Sicilian Rice Fritters)


Ingredients: At least 6 cups of chicken stock. (Low-sodium, if not homemade.) About 4 tb- spn of unsalted butter. An on- ion, minced. 3 cloves of garlic, minced. Arborio rice—about 1 ½ cups. At least a half cup of fresh ... continued on page 13


UPBEAT TIMES, INC. • April 2018 • 5 JOKES & Humor # 2


My sister was telling her husband about a wonderful program she had watched on TV. The show gave a national award to heroic people who put


themselves in grave danger to help out someone they hardly knew. She replied, “That sounds a lot like getting married.”


Are you interested in a free consultation about ways to protect your property now?


WILLS & TRUSTS


Michael C. Fallon Jr. ~ fallonmc@fallonlaw.net 707-546-6770


“I am not pretty. I am not beautiful. I am as radiant as the sun.” ~ Suzanne Collins UPBEAT TIMES, INC. • April 2018 • 5


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