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KEEPING YOU IN TOUCH - YOUR FREE MONTHLY NEWSPAPER DELIVERED DOOR-TO-DOOR FOR 31 YEARS LAKELAND PAVING DRIVEWAY & PATIO SPECIALISTS


•Driveways•Patios•Paths• •Walling•Fencing•Turfing•


Neil Ritson 07793 135012 • 01900 823368


CONSERVATORIES & WINDOWS


Your Local Craftsman at Competitive Prices with over 25 years experience!


CONSERVATORIES • WINDOWS DOORS • PORCH GUTTERING FASCIAS AND SOFFITS


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For a professional and reliable service please call


Installation, Service and Repair Natural Gas and LPG Bathrooms Heating, Radiators and Underfloor General Plumbing Work


Telephone 07717 765 199 r


rodthomas COCKERMOUTH CUMBRIA


Covering West Cumbria including Keswick Area


•Internal Plastering • Dry Lining •External Rendering & Pebbledashing •Reskims & Plaster Repairs


m: 07456 814 601 e : plasteringbyrod@aol.com


T.01900 828164 M.07706 931 505 email: lakelandpaving@hotmail.com


COCKERMOUTH ALLOTMENT & GARDEN ASSOCIATION


The Met office statistics have revealed that Northern England has had an average winter, though it feels that we have had a cold, wet winter in comparison to the better-than-average ones of recent years. The frosts will at least reduce the numbers of slugs and aphids surviving the winter, which we hope will reduce infestations during the next growing season.


Do not be tempted to dig when soil is still partially thawed, as it will chill the ground for months and affect the germination of seeds and the growth of all plants planted in that area.


Sow the following in an unheated greenhouse in modules, pots or trays as detailed in previous articles: beetroot, broad beans, brussel sprouts, carrots, leeks, lettuce, onions, peas, spinach and turnip.


Craig Muller


07990 543 324 / 01900 268 156 othpservices@gmail.com


COCKERMOUTH FRIENDS OF


CANCER RESEARCH UK For donations or In Memoriam gifts please telephone: 017687 76582


INFO@THECOCKERMOUTHPOST.CO.UK


When sowing direct into the soil, prepare the area by digging it over, removing all large stones and weeds, rake to achieve a fine tilth and sow the seed in accordance with the instructions on the packet to achieve the best results. If the ground is workable, try to prepare the area a few weeks before and incorporate


pelleted chicken manure, well- rotted compost or a proprietary fertiliser such as 6X (in an organic garden) or Growmore. If sowing near the earliest date recommended, it may be better to either sow in an unheated greenhouse or protect the newly-sown seeds with fleece. If we have a spell of cold or wet weather, then protection of the newly- emerging shoots with netting is a must as pigeons, pheasants, starlings and sparrows can destroy a crop, as can mice. The following can be sown direct into the soil at the end of the month or into early March if the weather is suitable: beetroot, broad beans, brussel sprouts, carrots, leeks, lettuce, onions, parsnip, peas and spinach. The climate here is so unpredictable it is preferable to raise your young vegetables in either the greenhouse or cold frame and then harden the plants off before planting out. Always, if possible give net or fleece protection to newly-planted crops.


We are contactable at: cagassociation@btinternet.com


Next Month: The Growing Season Begins ISSUE 423 | 22 FEBRUARY 2018 | 58


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