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KEEPING YOU IN TOUCH - YOUR FREE MONTHLY NEWSPAPER DELIVERED DOOR-TO-DOOR FOR 31 YEARS


WORDSWORTH HOUSE CHRONICLES THE


BATTLE FOR NATURE WORDSWORTH HOUSE AND GARDEN


CADS START 2018 WITH A BANG... ~ COCKERMOUTH AMATEUR DRAMATICS SOCIETY ~


...and a boo and a hiss, a Panda, an energetic banana and Donald Trump!


A British soldier holds a pet magpie


Wordsworth House and Garden reopens for 2018 on Saturday 10th March with a free weekend for locals and a powerful new exhibition marking 100 years since the end of the First World War.


Where Poppies Blow: soldiers, nature and the Great War celebrates the role of the natural world in helping sustain Britain’s troops through the horrors of battle.


Visitor experience manager Zoe Gilbert said: “As the home of one of the world’s best-loved nature poets, we’re thrilled to be showcasing this evocative exhibition guest curated by historian, farmer and prize-winning author John Lewis-Stempel.”


Where Poppies Blow reveals the importance of the British countryside and sense of place as an incentive for men to join up, the solace that nature and gardening provided in the trenches and the discomfort of living too close to nature.


John, who won the 2017 Wainwright Golden Beer Prize for nature writing, explained: “Nature mattered in the Great War. Tens of thousands went to war for the fields, the flowers, the birds of Britain.


“On active service abroad, soldiers lived in trenches, inside the ground, closer to nature than most humans had lived for centuries. Soldiers planted flower gardens, birdwatched and fished flooded shell-holes for eels. Nature was also a curse – rats and lice abounded at the front.


“Above all, the wonders and comforts of nature helped men endure the bullets and the blood. As one soldier of the Great War put it, ‘If it weren’t for the birds, what a hell it would be.’ This is the unique story of the British soldiers of the Great War and their relationships with the animals and plants around them.”


A first set of evocative exhibits, including the original manuscript of Edward Thomas’s iconic poem Adlestrop and paintings by artist brothers Paul and John Nash, will be on display until 8th July.


A second set of exhibits will go on show from Monday 16th July to Sunday 28th October, among them Thomas’s war diary, its pages bearing an eerie arc of creases created by the shell blast that killed him. Entry is free with admission to the house and garden.


Locals can enjoy a free visit to the house, garden and exhibition on Saturday 10th or Sunday 11th March – just take proof of your CA postcode.


INFO@THECOCKERMOUTHPOST.CO.UK  


       


 


 


 ISSUE 423 | 22 FEBRUARY 2018 | 38


If you didn’t manage to take in Cockermouth Amateur Dramatics Society’s panto, it is certain that you missed the best version of this annual tradition so far. The cast was made up from a very wide age range, including the very talented pair of youngsters, Morgan Goodfellow, who played Aladdin and Poppy Knight, his Princess Jasmine, with delightful input from The Jacqueline Evans School of Dance. Owen Evans as the evil Abanazer disguised himself as Donald Trump - in his bid to get his hands on the Magic Lamp. If you’re going to play a Baddie, you may as well go the whole hog! Great sets, colourful characters and lots of laughs made Aladdin hugely enjoyable for the each of the three audiences who packed the Kirkgate Centre at the end of January.


If anyone is interested in taking part in future professional workshops, two are scheduled for March and April. You can keep up-to-date with these and other CADS events via Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/baCADS/


The Next Big Thing will be performances of ‘The Bench’ on 2nd, 3rd and 4th of March at The Kirkgate Centre. You can book via the


Cast of Aladdin


Kirkgate Box Office, where concessions for U25s will be available.


Finally, may I pass on a reminder that CADS is always looking for new members. Membership is FREE and anyone with any level of experience is welcome and you don’t have to act! We would be delighted to meet people who want to help backstage, with light, sound, costume, or just rolling up sleeves and moving stuff! If you would like to come and meet us, an easy introduction would be to show up at our monthly play- readings. The time is 7.30pm on the first Wednesday of every month and we meet in the upstairs room of The Bush pub in Cockermouth’s Main Street.


Alison Shutt


Photo: Imperial War Museum


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