This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
A PASSION FOR PLANTS


Grafting and Budding by Nancy Schramm


greenthumb@carmansnursery.com


J


anuary is here (Happy New Year, everyone!)


and you know what that means – it’s time to talk propagation. Over the last few Januarys we’ve covered propagation by seeds, cuttings and divi- sions. This month let’s take a look at grafting and budding. Grafting and bud-


ding are grouped together because they both take a piece of a desirable plant and attach it to another growing plant that will, in the end, become the new roots for your combined plant. Why do this? There are many rea- sons. Hybrid tea roses are


EXAMPLES OF GRAFTING AND BUDDING ON FRUIT TREES. 10 January 2012 • Out & About www.outandaboutmagazine.com


traditionally grafted for mainly economic rea- sons, the grower can get saleable plants to market more quickly than from rooted cut- tings. Some roses are either especially poor or over exuberant growers, and grafting these to a different root stock can overcome these problems. Fruit trees are usually graft- ed to a specialized root stock, one that has been chosen for disease resistance, one that will somewhat dwarf an oth- erwise very large grow- ing variety or one that will tolerate diffi- cult soil con- ditions. Home


gardeners with limited space can


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52