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Radar 3/7


sustainable fashion, easyJet would no longer offer low cost flights and Rio Tinto would have diversified into land- fill mining.


According to Dragon Rouge’s head of sustainability, Fiona Bennie, who is the driving force behind the initiative, people have given up on governments to effect positive change in sustainable living and are increasingly looking to brands to take the lead. “We’ve created six provocative, chal- lenging concepts based on today’s brands projected into 2030 to demonstrate how they can have little to no impact on the environment while still retaining their brand personality and meeting consum- er expectations,” she said.


Renewable energy


M&S to host largest solar wall


M&S’ newly constructed distribution centre in Castle Donington will be the home to Europe’s largest solar wall when


M&S’ Castle Donington centre


“Here at Castle Donington the solar wall was the best possible option with such a large, south facing wall. The tech- nology offers one of the fastest returns on investment of any solar technology currently available.”


the facility opens early next year. The installation absorbs the sun’s energy to heat fresh air which will be used to help heat and ventilate the site warehouse - the largest dedicated e-commerce ware- house in the UK. Measuring 4,334m², the equivalent of more than 16 tennis courts, the solar wall is expected to provide energy savings of 1.1GWh, which is the equivalent energy use of two large M&S stores, and esti- mated CO2


savings of over 250 tonnes per year.


M&S project manager at Castle Donington, Roger Platt, said: “There’s a compelling case for renewable energy, both from a business and environmental point of view, when we build large, out- of-town sites.


In addition to the solar installation, the carbon neutral distribution centre produced no waste to landfill while it was constructed and has been part built using concrete from the previous tenant of the site, the Castle Donington Power Station.


Debate


Jury still out on choice editing


Choice editing for sustainability is fast rising up the corporate agenda, but ques- tions remain over how best brands and retailers can make such decisions to influ- ence consumer behaviour in a meaning- ful way.


Choosing what messages to edit in or out of consumer-facing campaigns and


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