This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Trends Sharing economy 4/4


off the road. “We’ve found 40-50% of members either sold their car or put off buying a vehicle due to using our service. And once members join they make much more rational decisions about whether to drive at all – which means more walking and cycling, and increased use of public transport.”


The sharing model is not as big a threat to established vehicle companies as one might think, Walker says. “Manufacturers were initially anxious, but have now embraced car-sharing to the extent that several, including BMW, Daimler and Volkswagen operate their own car clubs. So while this is change, it doesn’t repre- sent the death knell for traditional busi- nesses.”


Matofska says: “These successful new businesses are providing access to the resources we need, when we need them – rather than a car sitting around for 23 hours of each day while incurring road tax, you only pay to use it when you need it. “People are beginning to realise this is a smarter, savvier way to live, and one that is good for the planet. Ownership has become a burden, people need to save cash, and it is becoming more acceptable


because resources are finite, their busi- ness models are a road to nowhere and they won’t survive in future unless they adapt.


Going shwopping: Joanna Lumley to buy secondhand goods.”


Business stands to benefit – and thrive – from these cultural shifts, she believes. “There has been a recognition by the bravest and boldest companies that


www.compareandshare.com www.zipcar.com www.marksandspencer.com/ Shwop/b/1672188031


“So rather than selling something to someone once, why not sell it several times over? B&Q, for example, is look- ing at the rental market – when you buy a drill, how many seconds is it then used for in the average household? “There are incredible opportunities for those who take an entrepreneurial approach, the others will be left behind.” And a more resource-efficient approach to business can only benefit the envi- ronment. Matofska says: “We’re talking about every possible benefit. When you begin sharing resources you lower carbon emissions, divert waste from landfill, cut energy and water use from manufactur- ing… and by creating a sharing culture, people are collaborating, they become more socially connected, less isolated, healthier and happier, so the benefits to people are also huge.”


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67