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Case study 3/3


materials, so we have been working with selected suppliers – presenting our aspi- rations to them and asking how they can help us achieve the goal of reducing our carbon footprint – and they have been very influential in helping us to do so.” Looking from external partners to staff involvement and engagement, commu- nication has proved a key hurdle for Crown. “The biggest challenge has been, and continues to be, communicating effec- tively with the whole organisation – and beyond,” Lloyd says. “Unsurprisingly, individuals can be at different points in the sustainability jour- ney and more or less supportive accord- ing to their point of view. Ensuring active engagement has required a great deal of application and diligence.” To overcome this problem, Crown brought in environmental charity Groundwork UK to lead sustainabil- ity workshops for all employees, “chal- lenging them to consider their actions in their home life and as members of our business”.


Staff from every department (although some such as research and development may be particularly crucial), and every


If Crown continues to achieve a 2% per year reduction in emissions, it will meet its targets – developed using data from the footprinting exercises – despite Lloyd describing them as challenging. He says: “At the beginning you need to spend as much time as possible carrying out research. You have to benchmark the organisation, and ask yourself what you want to achieve as a business – only then can you begin to work towards achiev- ing your goals.


Recycled paint content is being considered


level of the business, have a role to play in successfully addressing carbon emis- sions. Lloyd says:


“It is certainly sensible


to ensure extensive buy-in from senior managers in the early stages. This will help to ensure sustainability is perceived as a key value of the organisation, insep- arable from good business.


“Communication will be made easier and adoption of sustainable principles throughout the business is a more likely outcome.”


“And you need to set solid, challeng- ing objectives, but targets that can be achieved with the right incentives. If they’re too high, staff feel no sense of achievement.


“And if they’re too low, getting there is far too easy.”


And Crown will continue to seek new ways to improve its environmental per- formance – for example the company is looking at the possibility of introducing recycled paint content to some products. Lloyd says: “We’re always looking for alternatives. We never stand still, because while we have made progress – and we’ve had our highs and lows, believe me – we’re still on the journey, and we’re far from reaching that journey’s end.”


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