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Trends Carbon Reduction 3/4


level strategic group that monitors over- all progress and improvements. Our fuel efficiency performance group manages the projects that will deliver carbon and fuel savings. “These groups draw on representa- tion from various departments, including flight operations, engineering, flight crew, design, customer experience, finance, commercial and sustainability to name but a few.


“So within the business there are a number of roles in addition to support and expertise from flying crew and oper- ational staff.” Virgin has also lobbied hard for the Single European Sky – a planned inte- grated, Europe-wide air traffic manage- ment system. The airline says: “Rather than having to zigzag through different airspaces, we and other airlines could fly in straight lines.


“This would be more cost-effective, reduce passenger travel times and most importantly deliver a potential 15-20%


fuel saving – reducing all airlines’ CO2 emissions by a total 12 million tonnes in Europe.”


Harvey says one of the OSyS data points relates to the cleaning rota – “so


The Airbus A330-300


we’ll know if poor cleaning is increasing drag and therefore bumping up fuel use”. Virgin’s latest sustainability report says: “Clean aircraft are aerodynamic, with less drag as they cut through the air, so they burn less fuel and emit less carbon. “Cleaning initiatives we’ve introduced over the past year include polishing the


leading edge of wings to ensure they’re dirt-free. We also use the EcoPower pres- sure-washing system on all our engines to make sure they’re free of grime or contaminants and run as fuel-efficiently as possible.


“Our aircraft cleaning is tracked on a weekly dashboard to make sure it’s all


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