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Without the containment, you need to affect all the mixed air within the room, which is an inefficient way to maintain temperature evenly within a data centre.


Nearly all the electrical energy going into a data centre will eventually become heat and we now have a better understanding of aisle containment and optimum datacentre layout.


We do not need to make a datacentre into a fridge, instead it is more effective and efficient to capture and remove the heat produced from server.


By thinking in this manner, data centre managers can decrease the facility’s Power Usage Effectiveness (PUE) ratio whilst maintaining a suitable environment for IT hardware.


In fact, modern cooling systems that capitalise on this philosophy will often pay for themselves very quickly when compared with more traditional technologies. For instance, indirect


evaporative cooling units exploit the temperature difference between the indoor and outdoor


environment through a plate heat exchanger.


If that temperature difference is less, the adiabatic functions can help continue the heat removal. Alternatively, in other systems you can utilise full or partial free cooling through a water circuit as a go-between when the outdoor air is colder than the indoor conditions.


With higher indoor temperatures, this extends the free cooling availability. If combined with the mechanical system at the same time, the mechanical system could benefit from the ‘cube root’ principle, where if the free cool circuit can provide 20% of what is required, then this is 20% less for the direct expansion circuit, saving near 50% in energy consumption. With this in mind, it’s clear why the data centre operators of both new and retrofit, should think ‘heat removal’ rather than ‘cooling’. With technologies such as adiabatic evaporation and free cooling, this philosophy of controlling the climate within a datacentre is only set to rise in popularity over the coming years.


Opt LG opteon.com


DATA CENTRES


for better


Opteon™ XP40 – A refrigerant that offers up to 12% improvement in energy performance.


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©2017 The Chemours Company FC, LLC. Opteon™ and any associated logos are the trademarks or copyrights of The Chemours Company FC, LLC. Chemours™ and the Chemours Logo are trademarks of The Chemours Company.


November 2017 37


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