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PHYSICAL DISABILITY


Planning Ahead


Tasoula Addison, Wills, Trusts & Probate Solicitor, at Gorvins Solicitors advises those caring for disabled family members of the best way to ensure they are provided for in the future.


Caring for a relative or close family friend with a physical disability is an incredibly demanding job. Planning for the future is also a demanding task and one that appears daunting for many, especially when the matters on hand are more complex. With the right guidance and advice, however, it really doesn’t have to be. There are many ways to protect those that you care for with a disability, to ensure that everything is in place and set up for a bright future with their best interests at heart.


Future Planning in your Will One of the most efficient and cost- effective ways to plan for the future


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is to make a will. A will allows a testator - the person making the will - to plan for the future of those they love and care for in the precise manner they want. You might want to consider appointing a legal guardian who would take responsibility for your child’s up-bringing and welfare needs. This is important for any parent, but if your child has a disability there will undoubtedly be additional issues that need careful consideration when selecting an appropriate guardian. It is also important to keep your will up-to-date, especially if you or your beneficiaries - those who are set to benefit from inheritance – have a change in circumstances.


For a disabled person, receiving money from an inheritance can have unforeseen consequences, if the person who left the inheritance did not put the correct arrangements in place. The reason is that receiving a lump sum could mean the disabled person is no longer eligible for certain benefits, meaning that the inheritance simply replaces the government funded benefits and services until the amount of money held by the disabled person drops back below the threshold to receive means-tested benefits.


This doesn’t have to be the case if you receive the correct advice.


www.tomorrowscare.co.uk


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