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INNOVATIONS & USING NEW TECHNOLOGY PENGUIN WEC INSTALLATION


Wello Oy’s wave energy converter (WEC) has been successfully installed at the European Marine Energy Centre (EMEC) in Orkney as part of the CEFOW (Clean Energy from Ocean Waves) project. The Penguin WEC was deployed at EMEC’s grid-connected wave test site at Billia Croo, off the west coast of Orkney, recently.


This marks a welcome return to Orkney,


with Wello having first tested at EMEC’s Billia Croo site in 2012.


INSTALLATION


The installation was carried out by Green Marine, an Orkney based marine services provider. Jason Schofield, managing director of Green Marine, oversaw the operations and commented: “The successful installation of the Penguin at EMEC was due to careful planning and a close working relationship between Green Marine and Wello Oy. The fantastic operational planning by the Green Marine team, utilising the weather windows at this time of year, allowed for a seamless operation.” Funded by the European Commission’s


research and innovation programme Horizon 2020, CEFOW is a five-year project led by Fortum to develop and prove Wello’s Penguin in real-sea conditions.


IMPORTANT MILESTONE


Mikko Muoniovaara, senior project manager at Fortum, added: “Deploying the Penguin in winter is an important milestone for us, providing valuable learning for both Fortum and Wello.


“Cost efficiency of operations and maintenance plays an important role in any renewables and Green Marine’s achievement shows that these operations can be done safely outside the summer season if needed.”


Wello Oy


MANAGING WAVE & TIDAL ASSETS


The wave & tidal industry has yet to be become a major player in the energy mix. However its technology is advancing swiftly and it offers a promising addition for the renewable energy sector. As it is quickening its way into the market, the significance of asset integrity management can’t be overlooked. Established in 2013 as a spin-off of the


Vrije Universiteit Brussels (VUB), Zensor believes that the way of maintaining healthy infrastructures can be achieved with proper integrity management of


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infrastructure assets. It all starts with selecting the right sensors.


INTELLIGENT MONITORING


Wind turbines are subjected to mainly cyclic wind and wave related loads. This makes the behaviour of wind turbines rather periodical and predictable. The integrity of wave and tidal structures however is less predictable considering the irregular nature of the mechanical and corrosive loads experienced.


www.wavetidalenergynetwork.co.uk


This results in a very high risk of various types of damage at wave and tidal structures, such as material loss and fatigue. For that reason it is necessary to keep continuous track of the state of health of the structures. Sensor-based monitoring makes this possible.


COST REDUCTION


For emerging energy technologies like wave and tidal, finance plays a rather important element in not only setting


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