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FOCUS ON CORNWALL 9MW WAVE


The company, based in Portland, Maine, USA has spent the past decade developing its Power Generation Vessel (PGV) technology, an innovative wave energy device of a scale that is unprecedented and is preparing to bring the first full-scale vessel across the Atlantic for installation at the Wave Hub site in Cornwall.


INDUSTRY EXPERIENCE RECOGNITION


GWave chose Wave Hub in recognition of the strong wave resource, infrastructure and industry experience available in Cornwall. Over recent months the company has engaged with the south west and wider UK supply chain, including Falmouth based Mojo Maritime, A&P and Northumberland based Tension Technologies International.


DETAILED TESTS


Both the company and its partners have also conducted detailed tests of the mooring system at the world- leading Coastal, Ocean and Sediment Transport (COAST) laboratory at Plymouth University.


The deployment at Wave Hub is a critical step in GWave’s programme to bring to market cheap, clean electricity from the ocean.


SPECIFICATION


The power generation vessel is currently under construction in the United States. The internal power take-off and insulating systems are well along in construction. The vessel is 75 metres long, 33 metres high, with the weight a little under 13,000 tons and has a nameplate capacity of 9MW.


OPERATIONAL DETAIL


The PGV is a floating sealed tube, so the sea water doesn’t engage with any of the internals. The tube is aligned pointing into the waves and as swell passes under it, the tube pitches fore and aft. Within the tube, there are large weights that roll on tracks. The timing


has been set up to ensure that as the vessel pitches downward, the weights roll downhill and then as the swing of the buoyancy pushes that end of the vessel back up, the weights are once again positioned to roll back downhill. The kinetic energy of the rolling weights is then converted into electricity.


GWave www.wavetidalenergynetwork.co.uk PAGE 29 ENERGY PROJECT


American wave energy developer, GWave has recently announced its plans for a 9MW wave energy project to be deployed at Wave Hub, Cornwall.


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