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SIGHTS


medieval Riga. The ‘eldest brother’ (Nº17) was built in the 15th


and 18th century


and is the oldest stone dwelling- structure in Riga. The other two were built in the 17th tury respectively.


cen- other sights


ART NOUVEAU ARCHITECTURE Alberta iela, Elizabetes iela, Vîlandes iela, Strélnieku iela. Art Nouveau, or often also referred to as Jugendstil, dominates Riga’s architectural heritage. Spread through out the city, but you will find the most expressive specimens con- centrated on the above mentioned streets. BRETHREN CEMETERY (Brå¬u kapi) Bérzu aleja (Take tram Nº11 to Brå¬u kapi stop in the direction of Mežaparks). The cemetery was designed by the famous Latvian sculptor Kårlis Zåle and by the architects A. Birzenieks, P. Feders and garden architect A. Zeidaks. MEŽAPARKS (Forest park) Meža prospekts (Take tram Nº11 to its final stop). It used to be and still is the most luxurious residential district of Riga. The construction was started in 1902, although most of the houses were erected before WWI and in the 1920s-1930s. You can admire different architectural styles: Art Nouveau, National Romanticism, Bauhaus. FREEDOM MONUMENT Brîvîbas iela. Designed by the famous Latvian ar- chitect Kårlis Zåle and constructed in 1935. The bronze casting of a woman (fondly nick-named ‘Milda’ by the Latvian folk) holds up three golden stars in her hands, which symbolise three Latvian regions: Latgale, Kurzeme and Vidzeme. The guard of honour stands sentinel at the monument. LAIMA CLOCK


30


Corner of Brîvîbas iela and Aspazijas bulv. A favourite meeting place of the Latvian youth, strategically located next to the Freedom Monument. At present, Laima is the major sweet manufacturer in the Baltics.


They mainly produce chocolate, so this is a great place to meet your ‘sweetheart’. ORTHODOX CATHEDRAL Brîvîbas bulv, near Esplanåde square. It is the largest Orthodox cathedral in the Baltic provinces built with the blessing of the Russian Tsar Alex- ander II. During the construction of the Esplanåde from 1876 to 1884, the Orthodox Cathedral of Byzantine was built on the Brîvîbas iela side, after a design of R. Pflug.


guides & tours BALTIC TRAVEL GROUP


13/15 K. Barona iela, tel. 67228428, fax 67228337. www.btgroup.lv FREE RIGA CULTURE TOUR Starts from Rainis Monument at Es- planåde, every day from 12.00, duration: 2h. www.rigaculture.lv Explore Riga intelligent way! Tour under the guidance of locals with cultural background (professionals, art historians, writers etc.). Walking tour includes city center, Old City, Art Nouveau district, Old Riga. The tour is for free, though tips are much appreciated. LATVIA TOURS


24 Aspazijas bulv., tel. 67085001, 09.00–18.00. www.latviatours.lv LIKERIGA.LV


Mob. tel. 29287890. www.likeriga.lv Alternative Riga guided tours: Latvian design shopping tour, creative quarter tour, eco picnic, wine degustations, cinema photo adventure. RIGA BY CANAL


Boarding near Bastejkalns, 10.00–20.00 (trip duration 1h), mob.tel. 25911523. www.rigabycanal.lv Sightseeing round trip on a charm- ing wooden boat. See the major sightseeing spots in Old Riga and the left bank of the Daugava—bridg- es, the legendary Central Market, picturesque architecture, as well as the more industrial Andrejosta. RIGA SIGHTSEEING (Dzintara Ce¬ß – Amber Way) Tel. 67271915, info@sightseeing.lv. www.sightseeing.lv RIGA SIGHTSEEING BUS TOURS (FaRiTour)


www.rigathisweek.lv/sights


πAnja Coppieters


πRodion Shehovtsov


πAnja Coppieters


πRodion Shehovtsov


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