This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
places, man.’ And he did.


On the 1973 album called Really you used a couple of the greats of bluegrass music in Uncle Josh Graves and Vassar Clements. What was that like? That was one of the highlights of my life, man. We recorded that out at Bradley’s Barn, and I was a big fan of Lester Flatt and Earl Scruggs. And, of course, Josh was the Dobro player on that stuff, and Vas- sar was ‘Mis- ter bluegrass fiddle player,’ and both of those guys came out to the studio and played that day. They were like Buddy Em- mons in the studio; they were so good you just kind of quit playing and dug what they were playing. Yeah, Vas- sar’s great, and so is Josh. Josh is really a nice guy.


Did you ever play much Dobro guitar? No, I had a Regal guitar, but I set it up to play it standard style. It’s not a squareneck Dobro. I’ve fooled around at times with a lap steel guitar, and messed with a pedal steel a couple of times, but I was around so many great Dobro players that I didn’t want to get into their territory. The guy out there now, Jerry Douglas, he originally played with a group called The Whites. That is before he got fa- mous and everyone wanted him to play on their records. I never have met him, but when he was playing with the Whites I was living in Nashville and they had a gospel TV show. And I said, ‘That Dobro player is going to go


You did some recording with some of the famous Muscle Shoals studio musi- cians. What was that like? We went down there, and I spent one day down there, and I recorded in the old, big stu- dio with Jimmy Johnson and the guys. Barry Beckett. And then we recorded over at an- other small eight-track stu- dio, I don’t know whose studio that was, and we got two record- ings out of that. I was only there one day. I’ll tell you where I origi- nally met those guys, when I first put out the Naturally album the record com-


pany got me a gig opening for a group called Traffic. They were an English group, playing pop rock, and there was about two or three thousand people in the place, and they hired the Muscle Shoals guys to back them up. That is where I met those guys. They always said, ‘C’mon down to our place and record. Come down to Muscle Shoals.’ So, years later, or a year or so later, I went down there and cut two or three sides with Beckett and those guys.


You recorded “After Midnight” on the Naturally album after Eric Clapton had a hit with it. Was that version of the song cut the way you always wanted to record it, or did you think you had to do it different since Clapton’s version was so popular?


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76