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Local clubs Correspondence


DERBYSHIRE GLOSSOP’S A


BOWLING CLUB A RECRUITMENT DRIVE FOR MEMBERS WAS GIVEN A HUGE BOOST BY INVOLVING A ‘YOUNGSTER’ FROM THE LOCAL PAPER


s a new season dawns on Glossop’s historic bowling club in Derbyshire, five long- standing members – Mike Fleming, Rick


Wood, Peter Logan, Frank Hazelwood and Andy Dawson – decided it was time for a recruitment drive. Mike said: “I suppose we’ve never really done


much promotion before and, despite our prominent position next to Glossop Cricket Club, not many people know there is a bowling club on North Road. We want to change that. “We’re a successful club, competing at a high level


and we’ve got first-class facilities here. As a sport, bowling doesn’t always get a lot of coverage, yet it’s a great game.” Andy invited local newspaper Glossop Life over to join in an early training session to see for itself. As the club is particularly keen to appeal to the younger generation, the members were delighted when the paper sent over 21-year-old Sam Bennett, the Assistant Editor. Sam admitted that he knew very little about bowls or the rules, and had typically only seen it played in the park by older people. Frank agreed this is often a problem for the sport generally: “People do think it is a sport for the older generation, but the reality


is very different. All the best teams in our league are made up of 30 and 40-year-olds and many teams have members aged between 14 and 20. And that’s because playing for a club can be fast paced and very competitive. Once you’ve mastered the sport and play as part of a team in competitions, it’s extremely competitive and great fun.” Sam was welcomed at the club and shown some of the moves. He said: “It is actually more difficult than you think, but I can see why members play for years. You can get hooked as soon as you start, each time wanting to do a little bit better than your last bowl.” Many members at Glossop Bowling Club are


committed sportspeople, some having played cricket and rugby previously. The club recently benefited from a £1,000 community grant and has used it to encourage new members. Chairwoman Eileen Wood said: “We have bought 10 sets of bowls for people to come and use and we introduced new beginner sessions when the season started in April, running every Monday from 6.30pm. “People are able to turn up and try out the sport


for free and if they wish, get a bit of coaching from the members who are keen to share their experience. Anyone is welcome and the only requirement is that you wear flat shoes.” As part of their move to interact with new members, Glossop Bowling Club has joined Facebook at www.facebook.com/glossopbowlingclub and Twitter at www.twitter.com/northroadbowls and encourage people in Glossop to follow them and find out more about this club that started back in the 1880s.


Editor’s note: Great idea to involve your local newspaper. You’ll find the editor is always interested in what’s happening in their area. Other clubs out there: why don’t you do the same?


member and local author Prof David Edwards wrote and published a history of the club in the book Gidea Park Bowling Club 1912-2012: The First One Hundred Years. The publication was well


supported by local businesses, which contributed 50 pages of advertising.


The 2012 season concluded


with a centenary dinner at Romford Golf Club, where MP Andrew Rosindell presented prizes and a Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Certificate to the club.


Members invited Sam Bennett, third from left, from the local newspaper to help publicise the club


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