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Off the rink Reporter IRISH INDOOR BOWLING


Hunter elected chair of IIBA


David Hunter was elected Chairman of the Irish Indoor Bowling Association at the 52nd AGM, hosted at the Templeton Hotel, Templepatrick. Hunter has been a stalwart of the association for many years, having held various posts, and was a popular choice by the members. The only other change


was that Artie Rice was elected as Honorary Secretary. He reflected on a busy year for the association, which


JUNIOR INTERNATIONALS


Two teams to be chosen for series


Bowls England will select two teams to participate in the Women’s Junior International Series to be held at Victoria Park, Royal Leamington Spa, Warwickshire, on Saturday 20 and Sunday 21 July. In addition to the Junior


International Team, an extra 16 players and two reserves will be selected to form the Bowls England Development Team following the trial to be held at Norgren BC in Warwickshire on Saturday 18 May. The Bowls England


Development Team will take the place of Ireland in the series, who recently informed the British Isles Women’s Bowls Council (BIWBC) that they would not be able to participate in 2013.


Those selected for the Bowls


England Development Team will also be included in the Junior International Squad Training Day to be held on in Royal Leamington Spa on Sunday 7 July. Tony Allcock MBE, Chief


Executive of Bowls England, said: “It is unfortunate that Ireland is unable to participate in the event this year but we are


hopeful they will return to the fold in 2014. “However, we are delighted that the BIWBC has invited England, as hosts, to provide an additional team as it will give many more of our younger women bowlers the opportunity to gain valuable experience of international bowls and further develop their game. This means


“I am sure that the series itself, with a total of 36 England players involved, will be a memorable occasion for players and spectators”


there will be even more to play for in the trial, and I am sure that the series itself, with a total of 36 England players involved, will be a memorable occasion for players and spectators.”


culminated in a reception and bowling exhibition at Stormont hosted by DCAL. The report also indicated the positive steps being taken to expand the game in areas of Ireland not presently affiliated to the IIBA. Election of officers:


President: David Sterritt; Chairman: David Hunter; Honorary Secretary: Artic Rice; Honorary Treasurer: Wilfred Crawford; Honorary Competitions’ Secretary: Jim McIlroy.


COACHING CORNER


Richard Boorman


Feedback will always be appreciated – email Richard at rbbowlscoaching@aol.com with your comments or questions on any of the areas mentioned in this issue’s column


W


e can practice for hours under the guidance of a


coach but, as we all experience, sometimes things go well and at other times quite the opposite. I want to discuss with you the part that our minds play in the course of our performance. There is, in coaching terms, a model delivery action, but in practical respects, most bowlers will experience difficulties in complying fully and consistently with this model.


Some of these difficulties will be determined by physical considerations, sometimes past injuries and other reasons. As a consequence, your coach will study how you respond to his/her clinical analysis of your delivery action as viewed against the delivery model. It may then be necessary


to discuss with you why you might not be able to comply with the model and, as a consequence, you will not have achieved the targeted outcome which you were seeking to achieve. Well-trained coaches from


Level 2 upwards will be able to suggest some changes in your delivery action which will, after some practice, help you achieve the desired outcomes. When coaching someone to


develop and/or improve their performance, it will soon become apparent to many bowlers, that while they may consider they are doing everything according to the instructions of the coach, the expected targeted deliveries are simply not being achieved with any really satisfying frequency. This normally results in you getting quite upset and frustrated with yourself. Have you heard bowlers complaining that the harder they try to do as directed by the coach, the worse their performance seems to get?


When this happens, it is usually


clear from close observation that the efforts of performing the delivery action as coached are simply not being done. So what is usually the main reason? Yes, many of you will think of the


answer, which often comes down to “I was not thinking enough about what I was doing”. Absolutely right and what are we likely to blame – our state of mind. Again absolutely right! Performing well at playing bowls


is very much a case of having one’s mind positively focused upon what we intend to do when delivering our bowls and if it is our role, to deliver the jack. Once someone starts playing and experiences the good games, a reflection usually identifies that our mind was well- tuned in to what


we were doing. Practicing shots


or any exercise routines that your coach might


have provided for you, will only be successful if you and/or your coach do a certain amount of mind training. This simply boils down to being able to concentrate. We will all have experienced the times when we have something on our minds which is inclined to interfere with practically everything else we need to think about. One suitable stage to attempt


to train one’s mind is when we are required to take a stance on the mat in the course of commencing our delivery. There are many good bowlers who adopt some quite significant features and perhaps movements that assist them to get their mind in gear to achieve their intended targeted outcomes. Conversely, you may also spot


features of someone who was playing well and then went off the boil.


It can, of course, work the other


way and someone gets their act together and, against perhaps all odds, they come through and win the game.


NationwideBowler 9


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