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A BEAUTIFULLY KEPT GREEN IS A TASTY PROSPECT FOR BADGERS, FOXES AND OTHER WILDLIFE… BUT PROTECTION IS EASY TO ARRANGE


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pring is here and, along with enthusiastic bowlers, the badgers and foxes are looking forward to getting on down to the local


bowling green – whatever the weather! They will looking for the best laid tables and


that’s where your bowling green comes in: badgers dig for earthworms and insect grubs, all of which come up nearer to the surface of grass during wet weather – especially on nicely laid bowling greens. Foxes, too, will excavate extra deep and wide in your green if you’ve used any blood or bone meal fertilisers: they’ll be hoping to find some tasty animal remains at the expense of your well-tended green! Rabbits and even deer will also take a share of the bowling green, if you let them. So, if you don’t want to hand out the napkins


to the badgers and their friends, what can you do avoid the damage they can cause? We at Electric Fencing Direct have many years


of experience in helping bowling clubs, and plan and create manageable electric fence systems which effectively deter badgers, foxes and other wildlife. And the good news is that electric fences are relatively easy to set up and cheaper than you might think – which is always a good thing when club committees have to face difficult decisions on where to spend their limited budgets. Basically, there are two kinds of electric fence


that you can use to keep wildlife off your bowling green: netting or a multiple-stranded, strained- wire electric fence. Our electric netting is particularly easy to put up and take down and is dark green, so it blends


60 NationwideBowler


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