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which will burn calories and increase muscle mass, says Joe Vennare, co- founder of the Hybrid Athlete, a fitness website.


Myth 4: Too Late to Start


DEBUNKED 11 VITAL TRUTHS


FITNESS MYTHS


by Lynda Bassett T


he U.S. Centers for Disease Con- trol and Prevention (CDC) has concluded that more than a third of Americans today are overweight. Yet it also reports that at least 30 percent of us don’t exercise at all, perhaps partly due to persistent fitness myths.


Myth 1: Lack of Opportunity


Even the busiest person can fit in some exercise by making simple changes in their daily routine. Take the stairs instead of the elevator, do squats while watching television, deliver a message in person instead of via email, take a desk break to stretch or stand while talking on the phone. Even fidgeting is beneficial. The point is to be as active as possible during otherwise sedentary hours.


20 Hudson County NAHudson.com Myth 2: No Time


The CDC recommends that each week, adults should exercise 150 minutes— the average duration of a movie—but not all at once. To make it easy, break it up into various exercise activities in daily, vigorous, 10-minute chunks.


Myth 3: Unaffordable


Activities like walking, bicycling and even jumping rope can be done virtual- ly anywhere, anytime. Individuals can create a basic home fitness center with a jump rope, set of dumbbells and not much more. Borrow an exercise video or DVD from the library or follow one of the many television fitness shows. “People can save thousands of dol- lars by combining five to 10 exercises into a burst-training workout routine,”


Many people feel they are too old or out-of-shape to even begin to exercise, or are intimidated by the idea of step- ping into a yoga studio or gym. “Stop wasting time reading diet books and use that time to go for a walk,” ad- vises Exercise Physiologist Jason Karp, Ph.D., author of Running for Women and Running a Marathon for Dum- mies. “In other words, get moving any way you can.”


Myth 5: No Pain, No Gain


Suffering isn’t required. In fact, feeling pain can indicate possible injury or burnout. Still, consult a doctor before beginning any exercise program. “Do not hurt yourself,” says Charla McMil- lian, a certified strength and condition- ing specialist, attorney and president of FitBoot – Basic Training for Profes- sionals, in San Francisco. “Rather, aim for a point of gentle discomfort,” she advises.


Myth 6: Must Break a Sweat


Perspiring is related to the duration and intensity of the exercise, but some people just sweat more than oth- ers. “How much (or little) you sweat does not correlate with how many calories you are expending,” assures Jessica Matthews, an experienced registered yoga teacher and an ex- ercise physiologist with the Ameri- can Council on Exercise.


Myth 7: Dieting is Enough


Women especially fall prey to the myth that they don’t need to exercise if they are a certain dress size. Even those at a healthy weight can be in greater dan- ger of contracting disease and short- ened lifespan than obese individuals that regularly participate in physical


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