This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Transportation


cilitating services delivery and resources for urban transport. The success of the Delhi Metro is testimony to the fact that there is enormous demand for mass transit if the service is efficient and made available at affordable rates. Other cit- ies too have implemented or planned mass transit projects opening up huge investment opportunities. But roadblocks on financing, land acquisition and regulatory issues remain.


Metro being mostly an under- ground facility is a preferred mode of transport to other rapid transit systems. However the BRTS (Bus Rapid Trans- port System) is a high quality bus-based transit system as proven in Ahmedabad, Gujarat


. But a BRTS must be comple- mented with an Intelligent Traf- fic System to yield its planned PHPDT


The FICCI-KPMG report also states that a sustainable trans- port system should co-exist with the need to safeguard the environment. However, some- times cutting trees becomes inevitable along the alignment of a planned route. The de- velopment of an MRTS must strike a balance between en- vironmental damage and long term benefits.


Financing the huge outlays for mass transportation systems is to be done through coor- dinated investments by the state and central governments,


private concessionaires, inter- national and domestic borrow- ings and development of pro- ject allotted land. The Planning Commission expects more than a third of the overall funds requirement in the urban trans- portation sector to come form the private sector by executing projects through PPP route.


There exists a dire need for a comprehensive legislation covering all aspects of urban transportation. Some headway for creating and independent body to oversee urban trans- portation needs at the city level has come in. Support- ing legislation is necessary for ensuring transparency in op- erations and legal recourses. (END) (About 600 words)


GIREM 101 17


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48