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edited by katie barnes. email: katiebarnes@leisuremedia.com lightweights


BUST A MOVE WITH DRAG QUEEN WORKOUT


Health club operators who are looking to spice up their fi tness offering might consider teaming up with local nightclubs/bars and follow in the footsteps of Floridita’s in London, which has recently created a drag queen dance class workout. The Cuban-themed restaurant/bar/entertainment


venue in Soho has launched a 90-minute exercise routine led by one of its cabaret performers – the cross dressing Globe Girls. Strictly ‘no fl ats’ are allowed in the workout, in which participants wear heels and learn a catwalk strut and various other diva-type moves in an attempt to improve muscle tone, fl exibility, co- ordination and core strength. The routine also includes fi tness/healthy eating


advice from Gladiators’ Tornado, while the Globe Girls treat participants to a rendition of their All The Single Ladies act. The class costs £25 – including a Cuban mojito cocktail. For £55, a three-course Latin American meal is added. Details: www.fl oriditalondon.com


GRAVY WRESTLING – IT’S A SAUCY SPORT


Lancashire is famous for its seaside town of Blackpool and traditional hot pot dish. It’s less well-known for gravy wrestling, despite the fact that the county will be hosting the fi fth World Gravy Wrestling Championships on 27 August. This wacky wrestling competition


will be held at the Rose n Bowl pub in Stacksteads. It involves wrestling in a pool of gravy for two minutes while being scored for audience applause and various moves. There are prizes for the best fancy


dress costume, while monies raised go to charity. For details, visit www.worldgravywrestling.com


smashing for low blood pressure


The stodgy reputation of potatoes has been questioned following research which shows that they may help reduce blood pressure in overweight people. Dr Joe Vinson, a professor at the


University of Scranton, US – and lead author of the report – said that when ‘potato’ is mentioned, people associate it with “fattening, high-carb and empty calories... In reality, when prepared without frying and served without


98


margarine, butter or sour cream, one potato only has 100 calories and dozens of healthful phytochemicals and vitamins.” In the study, 18 people split into two


groups and either ate six to eight small purple potatoes cooked in a microwave, twice a day for four weeks, or ate no potatoes. Although eating potatoes didn’t accompany changes in body weight, blood fats or glucose levels, the potato-eating group did see a drop in blood pressure.


Read Health Club Management online at healthclubmanagement.co.uk/digital


‘WATCHING’ THE WEIGHT AND COUNTING BITES


Researchers at Clemson University in South Carolina, US, have created a measurement device to make it easier for people to monitor whether they’re eating too much. Worn like a wrist watch, the Bite Counter


tracks wrist roll movements to identify when a bite has been taken. Researchers compare it to a pedometer, but for eating. Calories are calculated according to the number of bites based on a similar formula used by exercise equipment to estimate calories burned. An alarm sounds when a person has eaten too much. The idea is to eventually sell Bite Counters alongside devices like heart rate monitors. Details: www.clemson.edu


march 2012 © cybertrek 2012


PIC: KAREN STRUTHERS /WWW.SHUTTERSTOCK.COM


PIC: WWW.SHUTTERSTOCK.COM


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