This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
pilates Working with an


instructor means pilates exercises


can be adapted to suit the individual


BIRGITTE NYMANN PROGRAMME DIRECTOR, WEXER


training advice and guidance that has very little cost, I think virtual training is the best offer seen in a long time. It might not suit everyone, but I absolutely believe that most people will get a much better workout when following a virtual instructor compared to no guidance at all. When people do resistance training and cardio workouts, we


I


seldom ask if we’re giving them safe training – we let them work out on their own with little to no advice. But when it comes to group classes, where we’ve been used to having an instructor to inspire us and keep an eye on technique, we instantly question whether people will get enough from a ‘virtual’ instructor. While it’s impossible to create programmes that suit


everybody, at Wexer our videos focus on exercises that are safe for most people. After all, yoga and pilates classes use only body weight – the weight we carry around in everyday life without guidance. In addition, rather than try and tailor to the individual, the way we teach encourages them to do this for themselves. What virtual classes offer, that regular classes do not, is


repetition of the same programme over and over again. The more you do the same exercises, with the same instruction, the more you get to know the detail and work on getting better and better. You can also very easily follow your own progress, which is very inspiring to most people. In Denmark, virtual classes are very popular throughout the


whole day. The classes we offer with a live instructor are far more popular, but for the people who want group workouts outside of the peak club hours, virtual training is a good substitute – and people tend to like it much more than they fi rst anticipated. Me included!


For people who want group workouts outside of peak hours, virtual training is a good substitute


46 Read Health Club Management online at healthclubmanagement.co.uk/digital


s any kind of training suitable for virtual classes, if we want clients to get the best of the best? No. But if we want to give them


STEFANIA DELLA PIA


PROGRAMME DIRECTOR, EDUCATION & MASTER INSTRUCTOR TRAINER, MERRITHEW HEALTH & FITNESS


W


ith technology continuously advancing leaps and bounds, it was just a matter of


time before virtual instruction made its way to pilates. While not completely against this new concept, I do think these classes should be limited to general pilates enthusiasts. Those with specifi c needs – individuals who require rehab treatment, who suffer from misalignments or who have sports-specifi c training requirements – should defi nitely seek the expertise of a certifi ed instructor, to ensure correct technique. Ultimately though, only the individual can truly assess the form of instruction they are comfortable with. On the down side for virtual classes –


without a real-life instructor to train with – feedback, modifi cations, proper cueing and a true customised routine may not be possible. Obtaining specialist equipment and accessories may also be diffi cult. In addition, advanced moves and routines may not translate well through video, and personal safety could be compromised if exercises are performed incorrectly. Virtual programming does not allow for integration of an instructor’s diverse skills and experience that help bring a mind-body connection. On the plus side, gyms could offer ‘take-home’


classes, where members can work out at home or while away on business – workouts could be offered on their laptops, iPhones or online.


healthclub@leisuremedia.com kate cracknell


march 2012 © cybertrek 2012


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