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commentary currents Closed Memorial Day


Kiwash Electric Cooperative (KEC) will close on Monday, May 26 in observance of Memorial Day. To report a power outage or service problem, please call your co-op at 888-832-3362. Have a safe holiday!


Donate Canned Food


KEC is partnering with the Regional Food Bank of Oklahoma to gather food and funds for the Feeding Hope and Letter Carriers’ Food and Fund Drive. The goal is to raise $1 million and a million pounds of food for hungry Oklahomans.


Please bring food donations to KEC, 120 West 1st Street, Cordell. Donations will be collected April 28 - May 23. Find more information at www.regionalfoodbank.org.


Kilowatt Wins Award


The Kiwash Electric newsletter, Kilowatt, won several awards in the Oklahoma Association of Electric Cooperatives (OAEC) communicator’s competition, . In the small cooperative division, Kilowatt won an award of merit for Best Annual Report; award of merit for Best Overall Content; and received the Best Rural Electric Communicator Award. Awards were presented during the OAEC Annual Meeting in April.


Meeting Reminder


Mark your calendars for August 11! That’s the date of the KEC Annual Meeting. The meeting will be held in the Cordell High School auditorium.


Attending the Kiwash Electric Annual Meeting is the perfect opportunity for you to learn more about your co-op. Members who attend gain insight into the issues that affect Kiwash Electric, and enjoy visiting with co-op board members and staff. Your presence is appreciated.


2 | MAY 2014 | Kilowatt Co-op Principles Hold Strong


Electric. These principles, established in 1844 by a group of British cotton mill workers who united to buy goods at lower prices, help people come together to better their lives. These principles were adopted in 1995 by the International Cooperative Alliance, the organization for the global cooperative movement.


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Today cooperative activities are driven by values of self-help, self-responsibility, democracy, equality, equity, and solidarity. Co-op members believe in the ethical values of honesty, openness, social responsibility, and caring for others. Using the seven cooperative principles as guidelines, electric cooperatives put their values into practice.


Voluntary and Open Membership: Cooperatives are voluntary organizations, open to all persons able to use their services and willing to accept the responsibilities of membership without gender, social, racial, political, or religious discrimination.


Democratic Member Control: Cooperatives are democratic organizations controlled by their members, who actively participate in setting their policies and making decisions. Elected representatives are accountable to the membership. In primary cooperatives, members have equal voting rights (one member, one vote) and cooperatives at other levels are also organized in a democratic manner.


Member Economic Participation: Members contribute equitably to, and democratically control the capital of their cooperative. At least part of that capital is usually the common property of the cooperative. Members usually receive limited compensation, if any, on capital subscribed as a condition of membership. Members allocate surpluses for any or all of the following purposes: developing


even cooperative principles are critical to the success of all cooperatives, including Kiwash


their cooperative, possibly by setting up reserves, part of which at least would be indivisible; benefiting members in proportion to their transactions with the cooperative; and supporting other activities approved by the membership.


Autonomy and Independence: Cooperatives are autonomous, self-help organizations controlled by their members. If they enter into agreements with other organizations, including governments, or raised capital from external sources, they do so on terms that ensure democratic control by their members and maintain their cooperative autonomy.


Education, Training and Information: Cooperatives provide education and training for their members, elected representatives, managers, and employees so they can contribute effectively to the development of their cooperatives. They inform the general public – particularly young people and opinion leaders – about the nature and benefits of cooperation.


Cooperation among Cooperatives: Co-ops serve their members most effectively and strengthen the cooperative movement by working together through local, national, regional and international structures.


Concern for Community: Co-ops work for the sustainable development of their communities through policies approved by their members.


The success of electric co-ops today can be traced to the steadfast commitment to these cooperative principles and values. Over 900 electric cooperatives in 47 states abide by the principles. Kiwash Electric Cooperative has used them for many years to achieve success, and to remind ourselves daily of our commitment to you, our member-owners.


BY DENNIS KRUEGER G E N E R A L M A N A G E R


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