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SPRING Storm Season: Prime Time for Generator Sales


Only Mother Nature knows if Spring is going to be stormy or calm, but it’s a good idea to think about backing up your electricity with a


home generator. Generators come in two styles:


portable and permanent. Small portable generators that cost a few hun- dred dollars typi- cally can power a few appliances at a time – like a small refrig- erator, a TV or a hair dryer. Larger portable generators can keep the TV, water heater and sump pump run- ning if you lose electricity during a storm. Inverter gen-


erators, which are portable but


4 Reasons to Buy Food from Local Growers The fruits and vegetables you buy at your local farmer’s market are probably


more nutritious than the kind you get at a chain grocery store. Here’s why: Fruits and veggies that are shipped to supermarkets often are chosen because


they’re grown in large quantities and can handle the long trip to the store. The produce you buy from a local farmer most likely was hand-picked more for taste and nutrition than durability. Local growers might be more likely to use cover crops and composted manure


for fertilizer instead of chemicals, and that’s better for the soil they grow in. The better the soil, the healthier the plant—and the more nutritious. So the garden yield will be colorful and crunchy by the time it reaches your


kitchen, growers who supply supermarket chains harvest some crops long before they’re ripe. Some fruits, like apples, nectarines, melons, apricots, peaches and to- matoes, continue to ripen after they are detached from the stem. But studies show that their nutritional value is higher when they’re picked ripe. If you buy pre-cut veggies from the store, they’ve already lost some of their nutrients and will spoil quicker than the whole vegetable. Area farmers markets are opening this month, so visit the one nearest you. You


will get fresh, nutritious food, and you will be supporting area farmers. It’s a win- win deal!


cost about three times more than the standard model, are designed to run sensitive electronic equipment, like computers and home theater equip- ment. Permanent, standby generators


cost a few thousand dollars, but they can run large appliances. Larger ones can run all of the electrical devices, including the air conditioning sys- tem, while you’re waiting for power to be restored. Most permanent generators are


connected to the home’s power sup- ply through the electrical panel and will automatically turn on when the lights go out. A caution: A quali- fied electrician is the only one who should connect a generator to your home’s electrical panel. Installed incorrectly, the switch that makes the connection can “backfeed” electricity into a “dead” power line, and anyone who is touching the line – such as a co-op lineman – could be electro- cuted.


Don’t wait until the power goes


out to decide which kind of genera- tor you need. If you do, you’ll prob- ably wind up with the only unit that’s left on the store’s shelves during the middle of a storm – and you won’t get what you really need.


Correction In the page 1 article on the


upcoming rate increase in the April issue of VVEC Power Circuit, there is an incorrect amount. After the rate increase in June, the small commercial class customer charge will be $30.00 and not $30.30 as is printed. I apologize for the error.


KRB May 2014 VVEC Power Circuit 3


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