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When you hear the word “co-op,” what comes to mind? We hope you think of your friends here at Harmon Electric Association, but maybe you think of a local farmers’ co-op or a credit union.


You might be surprised to learn that co-ops, or cooperatives, can be found in many industries-and they offer a variety of services, each designed to serve their members in the best way possible. A cooperative is a not-for-profit organization owned by its members. Across the globe, cooperatives remain steadfast, annually generating more than $500 billion in revenue and providing more than 2 million jobs. As a member of Harmon Electric, you have a voice - in other


words, you’re not just a customer. Every year in April, you have the right to vote for the association’s board of directors. Harmon Electric strengthens our community by supporting economic development. As our service


area grows, our


distribution system grows, which makes it easy to see why strengthening the local economy makes sound business sense. So what other kinds of co-ops are out there? Co-ops fall under a variety of categories and services, including agriculture and forestry; consumer and retail; banking and credit unions;


health and wellness; and utilities, to name a few. Here are a few other national co-ops you might recognize.


• C-SPAN (Cable-Satellite Public Affairs Network):


Created in 1979, the American cable television network provides public access to the political process and receives no government funding. • Welch’s Grape Juice: More than 1,000 family-farmer


owners make up the Welch’s Grape Juice family, and they are located throughout the U.S. and Canada. • Best Western: Owned by independent operators of


more than 4,000 hotels in 80 countries, Best Western is one of the world’s largest hotel chains. • Ace Hardware: More than 4,600 Ace Hardware stores are independently owned and operated by local entrepreneurs. • Sunkist: This not-for-profit company’s membership is


comprised of numerous growers located throughout California and Arizona. • FTD Florists: The FTD membership includes thousands of growers located in the U.S. and Canada.


The list of cooperatives goes on and on, and as you can


see, we come in all shapes and sizes. At Harmon Electric, our mission is to provide you with safe, reliable, and affordable electricity. You may find more information about the services we offer on our website at www.harmonelectric.com.


Annual Report Receives Award Harmon


Lisa Richard, Staff Electric


Association,


Assistant at is


presented an award from Anna Politano, managing editor of Oklahoma Living during the Oklahoma Association of Electric Cooperatives Annual Meeting, April 7th in Norman.


Lisa, editor of the Harmon Hi-Lites, earned an award of Excellence for


HARMON ELECTRIC ASSOCIATION, INC 114 North First Hollis, OK 73550


Operating in


Beckham, Harmon, Jackson, Kiowa and Greer Counties in Oklahoma and Hardeman and Childress Counties in Texas


Member of Western Farmers Electric Cooperative Oklahoma Association of Electric Cooperatives National Rural Electric Cooperative Association National Rural Telecommunications Cooperative Texas Electric Cooperative, Inc. Oklahoma Rural Water Association, Inc.


the 2012 Annual Report in the annual Oklahoma


Association of Electric


Cooperatives Newsletter Competition. Highly qualified media judges score each Annual Report entry on layout & design, use of photos & art, how well financial information is explained and how clear and engaging the content is.


HARMON ELECTRIC HI-LITES Lisa Richard, Editor


The Harmon Electric Hi-Lites is the publication of your local owned and operated rural electric cooperative, organized and incorporated under the laws of Oklahoma to serve you with low-cost electric power.


Charles Paxton ......................................................................................... Manager


BOARD OF TRUSTEES Pete Lassiter..................................................................................................District 1 Jim Reeves....................................................................................................District 2 Lee Sparkman...............................................................................................District 3 Bob Allen .......................................................................................................District 4 Burk Bullington ..............................................................................................District 5 Jean Pence....................................................................................................District 6 J. R. Conley...................................................................................................District 7 Charles Horton .............................................................................................. Attorney


Monthly Board of Directors meetings held fourth Thursday of each month


IF YOUR ELECTRICITY GOES OFF, REPORT THE OUTAGE


We have a 24-hour answering service to take outage reports and dispatch service- men. Any time you have an outage to report in the Hollis or Gould exchange area, call our office at 688-3342. Any other exchange


area call toll free, 1-800-643-7769.


TO REPORT AN OUTAGE, CALL 688-3342 or 1-800-643-7769 ANYTIME


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