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THE F


irst introduced in 1945, the Mediterranean diet is an eating con- cept that focuses on food consumption typical of Greece and southern Italy. It failed to receive widespread recognition until the 1990s when it was re-introduced as a healthy diet by Dr. Walter Willett of Harvard University’s School of Public Health. Dr. Willett provided objective data demonstrating a nutritional paradox: in spite of a higher fat consumption, Mediterranean people experienced far lower rates of cardiovascular disease. Although higher in fat, the diet is very low in saturated fat. A 10-year study—Coronary Heart Disease in Seven Countries, April 1970—found that adhering to a Mediterranean diet and a healthy lifestyle resulted in a 50% reduction in early death rates. In 1999, a fi nal report on the Lyon Diet Heart Study was released by the American Heart Association. The Lyon study participants had all survived a previous heart attack. The study mimicked a Mediterra-


Crete Cakes


Mediterranean Fresh foods are preferred.


Northeast Oklahoma Electric Cooperative does not recom- mend or endorse any eating plan. We encourage you to visit with your physician or medical advisor prior to beginning any diet.


1 (15-ounce) can chickpeas (garbanzo beans), rinsed and drained


1/2 cup fresh fl at-leaf parsley 1 garlic clove, chopped 1/4 teaspoon ground cumin 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt, divided 1/2 teaspoon black pepper, divided 1 egg, beaten


4 tablespoons all-purpose fl our, divided 2 tablespoons olive oil


1/2 cup low-fat, plain Greek yogurt 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice 8 cups mixed salad greens 1 cup grape tomatoes, halved 1/2 small red onion, sliced thin


In a food processor, pulse chickpeas, parsley, garlic, cumin, and 1/4 teaspoon each of salt and pepper until coarsely chopped and mixture comes together. Transfer to a bowl. Add egg and 2 tablespoons fl our. Combine well and form into 8 patties, 1/2-inch thick. Roll in remaining fl our; tap off excess. Heat oil in a non- stick skillet over medium-high heat. Cook patties for 2 to 3 minutes per side, or until golden brown.


In a separate bowl, whisk together yogurt, lemon juice, and remainder of salt and pepper. Divide greens, tomatoes, onion, and patties evenly among 4 plates. Drizzle each plated meal with 2 tablespoons of yogurt dressing.


Summer Salad


1 large English cucumber 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil Black pepper to taste


6 cups arugula, fresh spinach, or watercress 1 (14-ounce) can artichoke hearts, drained and quartered 2 large celery ribs, sliced 1/2 cup sliced red onion 1/2 cup crumbled feta cheese


Cut cucumber in half, lengthwise, then slice into 1/4-inch pieces. In a blender, combine 3/4 cup of the sliced cucumber and the lemon juice. Add olive oil in a thin stream, while pulsing blender to thoroughly combine. Season with pepper to taste. In a large bowl, add remaining cucumber, arugula, artichoke hearts, celery, onion, and feta. Toss with blended dressing and serve immediately. Serves 4.


Mediterranean Fish 4 (6-ounce) halibut fi llets


1 tablespoon Greek seasoning, such as Cavendar’s


1 large tomato, chopped 1 onion, chopped


nean diet, but included a 20% increase in vitamin-C rich fruits. The fi ndings were a 70% reduction in mortality from all causes. Primary to the Mediterranean diet is eating a proportionally high quantity of vegetables, legumes, and unrefi ned grains. Olive oil is used to fl avor, dress, and cook foods. Moderate consumption of fi sh, seafood, poultry, and dairy in the form of cheese or yogurt, is encouraged. Fruit is eaten as dessert, while red wine is recommend- ed in low to moderate amounts. Eggs are rarely eaten, and not more than four per week. Also, avoid processed and pre-packaged foods.


1 (5-ounce) jar pitted kalamata olives 1/4 cup capers


1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice Salt and pepper to taste.


Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. On a baking sheet, place a large piece of alumi- num foil. Top with fi sh; sprinkle evenly with Greek seasoning. In a bowl, combine remaining ingredients. Spoon mixture over fi sh. Seal all edges of the foil to form a large packet. Bake in oven 30 to 40 minutes, or until fi sh fl akes easily. Serves 4.


1/4 cup chopped raw almonds 1 teaspoon cinnamon 1 cup quinoa 2 cups milk


1 teaspoon sea salt


Toast almonds in skillet until golden, then set aside. In a saucepan, combine cinnamon and quinoa. Stir over medium heat until the grain is warm. Add the milk and salt. Bring to a boil, then cover and reduce heat to low. Allow to cook at a simmer for 15 minutes. Stir in vanilla, honey, dates, apricots and half of the almonds. Top with remaining almonds. Serves 4.


May 2014 - 11 Breakfast Quinoa


1 teaspoon vanilla 2 tablespoons honey


2 dried, pitted dates, chopped 5 dried apricots, chopped


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