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Page 3 By George Continued from page 2.


the voltage and report to the utility any- time the variance exceeds predetermined levels. The applications in the future will only be limited by our imaginations as customers’ expectation will continue to drive technology.


But the advancement of technology is not limited to growing customer expec- tations. As I said earlier, if a transformer burns out, we install a new one and a couple of hours later the customer has power. Not good enough. What if the transformer could monitor itself and call the utility when it started to “feel sick.” Maybe the outage could be avoided and a little intensive care could save the trans- former. That technology exists today. Many of those half million dollar trans- formers in the substations already have some form of this technology. In the future the price will allow this technol- ogy to be placed on all new transformers and other electric line equipment. Fewer outages, fewer burned up transformers, and few calls from less than satisfied customers.


And this is just the beginning of the technological changes coming to the electric utility industry. Today these are not just ideas. These technologies are in the development and testing phases. Electric line conductors that are “hy- drophobic.” The idea is that they can be coated or impregnated with materi- als that will cause the conductor to reject the moisture before it has time to freeze. What a blessing that would be. One university is working with a power line monitor that can be installed in the substation and continuously monitor the electric power sign wave and predict a potential problem on the circuit. This technology is being developed and now being tested in the field that will not only identify some types of problems on the circuit in advance but also report the type of problem detected project and where on the circuit the problem is located. It is working, sort of, but not yet ready for commercial application.


There are some who are now thinking about electric utilities without poles and wires. Don’t count me among that group yet. However I am getting old, but still excited about what technol-


“We’re celebrating 75 years of peo- ple having a bold idea to electrify rural America,” said David Swank, CREC CEO. “I think we need to continue to have bold ideas. This consolidation is a bold idea, and is something that has not been done in Oklahoma. I believe the people 75 years ago were great leaders, and I just hope that people 75 years from now will say the same about us.”


CREC and CVEC are two finan- cially strong cooperatives. This con- solidation is an opportunity to add to the strengths of the cooperatives and will allow duplicate costs between the two cooperatives to be eliminated while expanding services. It will also provide opportunities for decreased outage response time. Preliminary results from the Cooperative Finance Network show the consolidation has the potential to save the cooperatives an estimated $14 to $42 million over a 10-year pe- riod.


Although there are still a few un- knowns currently being vetted by the CFC and Guernsey, the initial reactions from both boards of trustees and other cooperative partners are favorable to the consolidation, including those from Brandy Wreath, Director of the Public Utility Division of the Oklahoma Corpo- ration Commission. “You can’t underestimate the chal- lenges of rising power costs,” Wreath said. “Everything is going up, up, up. We are so impressed with the potential savings. From my perspective, do not leave it [the opportunity to consolidate] on the table.”


More information will continue to be released as final results of the studies are confirmed, but there is one thought the leadership of both coopera- tives agrees upon – the idea we must change in order to continue to provide safe, reliable and affordable electricity to you, our member-owners.


ogy holds for the future. All this technol- ogy will have a cost. But so does higher customer expectations and staying in business.


The ElectraLite Leading Change...Together Continued from page 1.


“We can keep doing the same things we’ve done today and continue to get less of a return on our results said George Hand, CVEC CEO. “We have got to change to continue to see results. There may have been a time when we needed 26 electric coopera- tives, but I do not believe that is still true today.”


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Find Your Hidden Account


Number and Win $25 If you find your account number hidden in this issue of The Electralite, you could win $25.


In order to win, the account number


must be your own. You need to report finding the number to us by the 15th of the month. And you need to report finding it by phone, mail or in person. Good luck!


May 2014


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